Melodie Muses On Vampires

They’re not the only ones with sharp teeth

Penny Grubb
Flint and Steel
Published in
4 min readAug 31, 2022

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Vampire: Image: Three-shots, Pixabay

The Wages of Dying by Meghan Purvis is a vampire book, but I didn’t know that when I started it. Not that there weren’t some massive signposts from page 1 onward, but I was wrapped up enough in the story and the lives of the characters that I missed them. And like the best books in any genre (or any competent vampire), it got its teeth into me and didn’t let go.

I was soon rooting for the flawed but determined Ruby Davis whose life was being turned upside down. It wasn’t easy for a young woman in Ruby’s position in either New Orleans or New York in the early 20th century in prohibition America.

The evocation of both time and place was so powerful I was left with the impression of having read the book by gaslight. I wasn’t alone in this view. One reviewer said:

Highly entertaining, fast paced story that is written so beautifully that at times it feels like really good poetry.

Here’s an in-depth review from author Stuart Aken:

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Penny Grubb
Flint and Steel

An award-winning crime novelist & long-time amateur poultry keeper, who specialised in teaching methods, healthcare & software engineering as an academic.