Penny Ponders On The World Of Shadeward

Living under a sun that never sets

Penny Grubb
Flint and Steel
Published in
5 min readJul 11, 2022

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Covers reproduced with permission from Fantastic Books Publishing

If you love Anne McCaffrey’s books and you’ve not yet found Drew Wagar’s Shadeward series, you’re in for a treat.

Drew Wagar has said in interviews that he is a McCaffrey fan himself. His books, though they have that McCaffrey vibe, are by no means clones. In fact, I would say that it’s only his Shadeward series (so far) that falls within the McCaffrey envelope.

The Shadeward world is real

Ok, so the Shadeward world is made up, but it could be real — it could exist somewhere out there without breaking any of the laws of physics. Wagar does his homework. The star systems he writes about exist or could exist — the locked orbits that give us a planet on which the sun never sets are a real thing. And everything that happens as the story unfolds has a solid explanation behind it — bear that in mind as you read. Wagar can write fantasy too, and he writes it well — check out his Lords of Midnight series — but Shadeward is solid science fiction.

If the series grips you, you’ll have more to explore in his pieces about the science and astronomy behind the series.

The main series comprises 4 novels:

My advice is to read them in order — I don’t always advise that for a series, but although each can be read as a standalone story, the way they build on each other adds extra dimensions as the books progress.

As you will know if you’ve encountered me pondering before, I’m not aiming for book reviews. I’m homing in on specific areas of these books where I’ve wanted to know more or where I’ve been left with unanswered questions.

The Shadeward series is being put under the spotlight for Fantastic Books Publishing’s

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Penny Grubb
Flint and Steel

An award-winning crime novelist & long-time amateur poultry keeper, who specialised in teaching methods, healthcare & software engineering as an academic.