MUJI E-commerce Redesign

Flora 원선 Baik
Mar 19, 2018 · 4 min read

My Role: UX Designer | Duration: 2 Weeks

Project Overview

Muji’s e-commerce needed some redesign work to increase sales. More specifically, it needs a restructuring of the navigation, improvement of a product search, and check out flow process.

Problem Statement & Hypothesis

Muji’s e-commerce revenue is not on target and in-store shoppers are not translating to online shoppers. How might we help Muji restructure and redesign their e-commerce platform so that the user can easily find and purchase items and, therefore, increase revenue for Muji?

RESEARCH PHASE

Contextual Inquiries

Task: Visited Muji at Flatiron district to observe how people shop in the store

Goal: Understand shopper’s motivation for coming to Muji

Findings:

  • Everyone loves Muji for their “simple design.”
  • Muji is known for their stationary and home goods.
  • In-store experience was key to build brand preference.
  • People’s moods were light and exploratory.
  • There were multiple same-day return customers because of a “sale” item.

Usability Testing

Tasks

  1. Add something you want to your wishlist
  2. Buy a striped shirt for yourself
  3. Find a 87L black suitcase
  4. Browse furniture for your new apartment

Findings

  • The fixed Muji logo was understood as “home” to the e-commerce site, but instead directed users to global Muji site.
  • Category name & product listings do not align.
  • There is no Travel section in the left column navigation for suitcases or on-the-go items
  • Search functionality was very difficult. Without the exact word on the title, the shopper was left with “no results found” often. Plural or synonyms were useless.
  • Wishlist” was confusing because people decided to go to the “My Wishlist” tab

Competitive Matrix

  • Ikea and Uniqlo were the closest competitors for simple aesthetics
  • Ikea, Bed/Bath/Beyond, were the closest competitors for number of product categories

Heuristics Findings

We used the Abby Method to score Muji against Uniqlo.

  • In store pick up was available for many stores that relied on the in-store buying experience
  • Product ratings were important part of the product page.
  • Sale as a category was available on every page for competitors to drive sales.
  • Favoriting an item was a defined feature.
  • There were rewards & account offers for competitors.

Card Sorting & Sitemap

3 Rounds

  1. Closed Sorting (5 participants): Muji’s Subcategories into Muji’s Categories in the left hand column
  2. Open Sorting (7 participants): Clarified unhelpful subcategories from cards with most discrepancies
  3. Closed Sorting (7 participants): Synthesized Round 2 tester’s categories with Round 2 clarified subcategories

After 3 rounds of card sorting, we found the most intuitive way to categorize products that Muji sells.

Sitemap before card sorting
Sitemap after card sorting

Business Model Canvas

Flows

Task Flow for a user
User flow to buy a suitcase

DESIGN PHASE

I sketched, wireframed, and tested 2 times with at least 4 users.

Redesign 1: Top Header

Redesign 2: Navigation

Redesign 3: Promotions (New)

Redesign 4: In-Store Pick Up Feature (New)

Prototype

Link to InVision Prototype

Next Steps

  • Check with sales team increase revenue in 2 weeks.
  • Test wishlist and favorites with data team by next week.
  • Research content for moving carousel by next week.
  • Test how important ratings are in the next 3 weeks.

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Flora 원선 Baik

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Crazy about design systems that impact personally, relationally, and systemically.

Flora’s UX Portfolio

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