FTN Daily #14 — Wednesday, 19th October 2016 — Health and Science

Just Wait

Why Scientists work on an Atlas of every single Human Cell, why it’s good to wait, why Japan uses Robotic Babies and why Politics make you sick.


How I Learnt to Stop Worrying

The five-second rule is wrong. Your food gets contaminated when dropped. But you may as well eat it. Aaron E. Carroll for the New York Times.


Pay Attention!

Misdiagnosing and medicating kids for ADHD does them no good. But it does boost drug sales. Gareth Cook for Scientific American.


Just Wait!

The secret of success is utterly boring. It’s easy to understand and difficult to achieve. Work hard and delay gratification. Johnson Kee for The Mission


Square Eyes are so yesterday

Duckfaces look silly, yes. But even worse: Your Addiction of taking Selfies could injure your Body more than you think. Maria Masters for health.com tells you — from Selfie Elbow to TV Neck — four Injuries modern Technology could cause.


Look at that cute, little Robotic Baby!

How can you encourage young Couples to get Babies? Because it’s looking into a very old Future, Japan is giving Robotic Babies a try. Mark Robert Anderson for Time.


Judging a Book by its Cover

Your yummy looking Apple is wearing some sexy Label, which declined it as “Organic”? Well, that doesn’t mean that you are one healthy Guy. 
Organic “isn’t a magic label that makes bad food good for you”, says Eric Ravenscraft for Lifehacker.


The Many Trillion Cells Story

Scientists seek in an International Effort to map all Human Cells — Trillions in Number — in a huge Atlas. Like Google Maps for your Body — to fight Diseases for Example. But that will take some Time. Jef Akst for The Scientist.

Cellular Cartography


Look at this pompous 3D-Pompeii!

Want to take a look how the Living in Pompeii was, before Mount Vesuvius covered everything with Ashes and Lava? Thanks to a Academic Team from the Lund University in Sweden you’re now able to. Matt Burgess for Wired.


In Denial

While the world is improving, people tend to believe it’s getting worse. Because bad news travels fast and then stays. Johan Norberg for CapX.


Freedom Today will return tomorrow with an issue about People and Society.


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Thank you for reading today’s issue of Freedom Today and apologies for being a bit late today!