Do you want to know the difference between the folks who are constantly creating new things, selling their ideas as products and making money doing what they want to be doing… and everyone else?

It’s easy—they put in the work required to make those things happen. They show up and work. Even (or especially) if they don’t feel like it or want to.

Making something part of your daily routine is a huge step towards shipping what you create. Most writers I know commit to writing 500-1000 words a day. Every day. Even when they’re busy/tired/uninspired. They make a promise to themselves to put the work in.

What’s the point of doing that? You can train yourself to be better at “being creative on-demand”. And this is truly a wonderful thing. It makes it easier and faster to create more of what you enjoy creating.

It doesn’t mean every time you sit down to work at your craft you magically shoot rainbows and unicorns out your ass, but it does mean that the more hours you put in, the more likely you are to get two things. The first is the more work you put into something, the more likely you are to get better at it. The second is the more time you put into something, the closer you’ll get to completing it.

Obviously there are limitations to this. You can’t work 24/7 at something and expect the result to be great. Our bodies weren’t meant to run continuously—they require sleep, food, downtime and even fun. Creative batteries need recharging. But committing to working at something every single day is the best and simplest way to get from idea to launch.

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This article initially appeared on my newsletter, The Sunday Dispatches.