Ask us what it’s like to work at mySociety

The mySociety lot, back in 2015, at our annual retreat

Are you thinking of applying for a job at mySociety? Need to know a bit more about us before you do?

Well, here’s your chance to ask questions. You can pose yours in the comments to this post, and if your question’s about how we code, you’ll get a response from a developer; if it’s about HR matters, from our office manager; if it’s about our research, from one of the Research team, and so on.

Give us a little time to get back to you — we’ll try our best to respond within two working days.

Why this?

It’s fair to say that there’s an excellent level of staff satisfaction at mySociety: as proof, it took around ten minutes to round up the quotes from colleagues on our web page about ‘company culture’.

But there’s no doubt that our way of working can take a little getting used to. We’re not set up like other organisations, and new colleagues often spend the first few weeks coming across multiple little surprises: everything from the light-touch management that lets you set your own priorities, to the amount we use video conferencing — it can all seem very unusual when you’re not used to it.

(Conversely, these are often the aspects that people grow to appreciate the most, once they’ve settled in.)

That ‘culture’ web page is an effort to set expectations a bit, but we can’t know what questions everyone will have.

So that’s where this blog post comes in.

We’ll promote its existence whenever we have a job opening, but anyone is welcome to ask a question any time and we’ll do our best to answer it. (If you prefer to ask privately, drop an email to hello-@-mysociety.org instead, or you can message us on Twitter at @mySociety — DMs are open).

This post is an experiment: we’ve also thought about using Reddit, Github, or Tumblr (not to mention an adapted form of our own WriteInPublic software) but let’s see how this goes before we decide whether we need anything more complex than a simple post with comments below it.

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