Hyungoo presenting about LGBTQ+ inclusive education and identity formation

The Relationship Between LGBTQ+ Inclusive Education and Identity Formation About Queer Asian and Pacific Islander Youth

Being in a place where people with diverse backgrounds and interests, but within the sphere of international comparative education, convened to exchange ideas and network was unforgettable. That the conference was in a large city in the South, known for its soul food and hospitality, was an added bonus. Because the conference was short relative to the number of presentations scheduled to be given, I could not attend every session I wanted to. However, meeting people from all over the world, including my home country of South Korea, in one place and sharing our respective research topics was an exhilarating experience.

My presentation, which was on exploring the relationship between LGBTQ+ inclusive education and identity formation about queer Asian and Pacific Islander youth, was on the second to last day of the conference. My group members and I — shown in the above picture — had worked hard to put our presentations together, and we could not wait to show what the past months of research had culminated into. Even 15 minutes before our scheduled presentations, we rehearsed and gave each other feedback and encouragement. All of us were nervous, but as soon as the clock struck 5pm and the presider among us addressed the audience, we knew it was go-time. In the end, everyone, despite days of nervousness and dread leading up to the conference, gave a successful presentation that drew a loud applause from the audience at the end.

Overall, I am grateful for having been given the grant from FSI that aided my trip to be part of a very memorable and meaningful experience. I am sure conference participants from future cohorts will benefit greatly from the generosity of FSI.

CIES 2017 was the very first conference I attended as a presenter in my life. Since the start of the academic year last September, my cohort members and I had put in great efforts to first get approval from the conference organizer to present, and once the approval was given, make our research informed and presentable. When the week of the conference, which was held in Atlanta, Georgia between March 6 and 9, finally arrived, we all knew we were ready to be considered scholars in the field of international comparative education — not because we paid to be members of the organization but because we were in positions to contribute to the field’s overarching scholarship.

Being in a place where people with diverse backgrounds and interests, but within the sphere of international comparative education, convened to exchange ideas and network was unforgettable. That the conference was in a large city in the South, known for its soul food and hospitality, was an added bonus. Because the conference was short relative to the number of presentations scheduled to be given, I could not attend every session I wanted to. However, meeting people from all over the world, including my home country of South Korea, in one place and sharing our respective research topics was an exhilarating experience.

My presentation, which was on exploring the relationship between LGBTQ+ inclusive education and identity formation about queer Asian and Pacific Islander youth, was on the second to last day of the conference. My group members and I — shown in the above picture — had worked hard to put our presentations together, and we could not wait to show what the past months of research had culminated into. Even 15 minutes before our scheduled presentations, we rehearsed and gave each other feedback and encouragement. All of us were nervous, but as soon as the clock struck 5pm and the presider among us addressed the audience, we knew it was go-time. In the end, everyone, despite days of nervousness and dread leading up to the conference, gave a successful presentation that drew a loud applause from the audience at the end.

Overall, I am grateful for having been given the grant from FSI that aided my trip to be part of a very memorable and meaningful experience. I am sure conference participants from future cohorts will benefit greatly from the generosity of FSI.

Written by Hyungoo Lee, M.A. candidate in International Education Policy Analysis at Stanford University. He received an FSI conference grant in winter 2017.

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