Use Reflected Light to Make Your Photographs Irresistible

You’ll grab people’s attention

Mark Ali
Full Frame

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The sun rises over (and reflects off of) a calm lake in upstate New York.
“Peeking Over the Horizon” (© Mark Ali)

To “reflect” is to look inward. At least that’s often the way the term is used. The word “reflections” refers to thoughts, feelings, ideas, and opinions.

But let’s not reflect on that.

Let’s instead look at the scientific definition of these words, which has to do with the bouncing back of something, usually light (though it could be sound, or even heat). As photographers, we love to play with light — not just capturing it directly, but also on the rebound.

Even non-photographers are enamored by reflections. An image that depicts reflected light, in any form, tends to be irresistible to a viewer. It grabs their attention. And that, after all, is what a photographer wants to do.

I’ll show you what I mean.

(While reading this article, you may want to listen to some nice music. May I suggest “Reflections” by the Supremes, or “Reflected Light” by Sam Phillips? Both are great tunes.)

Reflections on Water

It’s cliché, I know, but water reflection shots just can’t be missed.

It could be a sunrise (like the one above), a sunset, or any time in between. Clear water bounces back light, and a…

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Mark Ali
Full Frame

I’m a writer, a photographer, a music lover, and a professional ice sculptor. I’m kidding about that last thing. (View my portfolio at: markaliphotos.com)