The Reason We Haven’t Found Planet Nine

And the theory opposing its existence

Ella Alderson
Feb 10, 2019 · 5 min read
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Image by Ivan Shaykov
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This graphic shows the path of Planet Nine in orange while the Kuiper Belt objects travel in the plane and perpendicular to the plane of the supposed super-Earth. Image by Caltech/R. Hurt (IPAC).
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Subaru is the same telescope which helped find Farout, the most distant object in our Solar System. It’s the first object we’ve seen orbiting beyond 100 AU (9 billion miles) and further studying its path over the years will help see if it’s supporting evidence for Planet Nine. Farout (2018 VG18) can be seen moving in the center. Image by Scott S. Sheppard/David Tholen.
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It is possible that both Planet Nine and and an icy disk like the one pictured here are responsible for the orbits of the Kuiper Belt objects. Image by European Southern Observatory / M. Kornmesser.

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