GAMES ARE GOOD FOR PEOPLE AND THE WORLD

A word of caution to non-gamers: Games aren’t bad. They make life better.

Parents are always typically worried about the various health hazards and conditions commonly associated with gaming addiction. Games are easily blamed for exploiting our brains and the reason for antisocial behavior in youngsters. However, research shows that complex and challenging games can have positive social, emotional and psychological benefits.

One of the biggest positive effects games can have on a person is the fact that they make people happy. The benefits go well beyond entertainment and improved hand-eye coordination. It strengthens a range of skills such as reasoning, memory and perception, just by playing with strangers online.

According to world-renowned game designer Jane McGonigal, games inculcate some very good habits in people. Gamers’ innovative juices keep flowing while competing against each other. Their sense of accomplishment and self-confidence rises as they improve in the game.

Games are considered to be effective to learn resilience in the face of failure. It gives you opportunities to fail freely and start all over again thereby building emotional resilience in gamers as they learn to survive with on-going failures.

Most of the games I grew up playing imparted a lot of wisdom to me. Like Super Mario taught me that there are many routes to success besides the traditional one. The game of Chess trained me to understand that sometimes in life you have to take a step back for your own betterment. Grand Theft Auto opened my eyes to exploring the world around me.

Strategy games like Sudoku, Rummy, Poker and Teen patti have helped me hone my skills as an expert problem solver. Who knew problem solving could be so much fun?

These games will never go out of style. All players appreciate the kind of gameplay that stimulates planning and strategy. Poker helps with mental math, playing speed, and concentration. Sudoku is all about logical deduction. Rummy helps develop “thinking a few steps ahead” skill. In fact, there exists plenty of games that are designed to improve brain functionality.

So, what lessons have you learned from games? Do you think that playing games are important for development? Share your thoughts with me in the comments below!

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