Why Female Entrepreneurs Are Ruling Online Dating Apps?

7 Cube
7 Cube
Apr 6 · 6 min read

The online scene especially in the applications domain it’s changing very fast. With the launch of Tinder in 2012, iPhone people of all sexualities started to look for love or casual dating and quickly made the app the most wanted on the market. But this gigantic shift occurred next year when Tinder was listed on Android phones too. What changed in the scene was more than the swipe-right, swipe-left approach. It was the ancestry enhanced safety using dating apps. Especially the relationship economy who transformed the terms of how humans find and court their potential partners. Quarantine dating has pulled away from the crutch of physical intimacy, a cover for all incompatibilities. Even the core assessment of the loneliness, the boredom, the hope and disappointment of being single and looking for something, haven’t gone away. (more than (40%) of internet users in the U.S. have used a dating app in the last six months)

It was the moment when the former marketing executive of Tinder Whitney Wolfe Herd after being herself a victim of harassment made up a new company. In 2014 she sued a founder of Tinder for sexual harassment and began receiving death and rape threats on Twitter that caused her severe panic attacks and paranoia. Her reaction: developing out a new business called Bumble. From a big city, she retreated to Texas. “I was broken,” she says in an interview. There she tried to make a new social network called Merci but got an email from Andrey Andreev, a London-based Russian billionaire who had been building successful online apps like Badoo who knew her from Tinder. He told her to come work for him. Initially, she refused based on her new business going on. But after a lot of discussions in one night at dinner discovered the spark of Bumble. “What if women make the first move, send the first message? And if they don’t, the match disappears after 24 hours, like in Cinderella, the pumpkin and the carriage?”

Bumble solved the frustrating challenge that every woman seeking opposite matches will get: unwanted, creepy, or vulgar men. The success was based on expanding the options for meeting and matching. A differentiating factor idea: the woman will initiate chatting. More than 10% of Bumble’s users pay $9.99 for a monthly subscription to access features like extra time to decide whether a partner merits a message. Bumble has 70 employees, approximately 85% of whom are women, including in all the top jobs all using mottos like: “You’re a Queen Bee,” “Be the CEO your parents always wanted you to marry” and “Make the First Move.” Based on the negative experiences many have had on Tinder and other dating apps a lot of women's got on Bumble and build Whitney Wolfe Herd into the world’s youngest self-made woman billionaire. Her nearly 12% stake in the company was worth $1.6 billion as of 31 March 2021. Her success is one of the great business stories of the smartphone age. Nine digits in three years are the kind of vindication people would make movies about. A wild call in the industry traditionally dominated by white male leadership.

Another former executive this time of Match.com Kim Kaplan was able to move into the game also. Dissatisfied with the dating app landscape and the lack of video dating she started Snack. The new “thingy” eliminates the possibility to jump from matching on one platform to communicating on another platform. So why not combine video sharing with a dating app? Striving to create a more authentic dating experience because fake accounts undeniably less likely to occur in a video streaming. Wolfe Herd and Kaplan are not the only women founders. Others moreover stirred up substandard app features. Like the 3 Kang sisters: Arum, Dawoon, and Soo. They co-founded the dating app named Coffee Meets Bagel. Their approach is more based on control than on options. Unlike the number of swipes available on its competition, Kang’s app gives each user a small number of “bagels” (or matches) each day at noon. They say that until now CMB made more than 2.5 billion bagels and created more than 50,000 happy couples. The App with most users being females. Besides all, we have at least one other dating startup made by a female entrepreneur Amanda Bradford. It’s called The League or “Tinder for Elites”. Users in The League can limit who sees their profile and an algorithm that looks at things like education and industry field determines who gets in and off the waiting list. You can even for a price of $15 per month, survey the app without ever showing your face. (Consumers spent $3 billion on dating apps in 2020, which is 15% more than in the previous year.)This new generation of dating apps includes as well Lulu where women can publicly rate men on everything from appearance to sexual performance, The Grade, which lets users score each other on the quality of their messages and speed at replying and Siren where a woman’s photo is hidden to men until she chooses to match.

Source: App Annie — www.appannie.com

At first glance in the early years, all apps have been mainly developed in the “boys culture” of Silicon Valley. So no issues regarding the creep factor and abusive messages. The Dave rule an inside joke who has a true meaning was ignored all along. (the rule says: for proper gender balance must have at least as many women in a team as guys named Dave). But, because women are very fragile on dating apps, men have always been the focus. The customers ought to be monetized. Therefore they perpetuated the problem until women entrepreneurs came and marked a change in attitudes towards dating. Shifting from a men's approach to a women-first approach. They identified video chatting as a first “date” as such an efficient way to decide if clients are interested. But how long can video chatting stay exciting? The moral dilemma associated with the choice of medium can extend way beyond the digital connections. They pointed out that online romance suggests that ‘romance’ is not a spontaneous, authentic, and passionate process but something necessarily calculated, stage-managed and premeditated. Moreover, they propagated “Safety” as a trending word in the age of affluence and attention. A more novel approach like a short quiz verifying understanding before admittance or an AI-powered private detector that scans images for inappropriate content. In addition, consumers started to turn away from the casual hook-up culture to a more diversified one. A model which removes limitations, such as the number of swipes. With this in mind, it’s not surprising that a new wave of startups launched apps where men can only be invited by women. Which goes to the feeling that female empowerment is a new trend in the tech world to see what makes women tick?

PS: My advice is to encourage users to exercise caution when meeting up with other users online and blocking or reporting those who make them feel unsafe.

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7 Cube

Written by

7 Cube

Born to make impact. 15 years in brand/website development, UI/UX, e-commerce and digital art. Growth Hacker. Web Developer. Web Designer. Illustrator.

Geek Culture

A new tech publication by Start it up (https://medium.com/swlh).

7 Cube

Written by

7 Cube

Born to make impact. 15 years in brand/website development, UI/UX, e-commerce and digital art. Growth Hacker. Web Developer. Web Designer. Illustrator.

Geek Culture

A new tech publication by Start it up (https://medium.com/swlh).

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