Distrazioni e altre cose dei tempi moderni.

andrew sullivan

Andrew Sullivan, con un articolo pubblicato sul New York Times Magazine, ritorna sui motivi che l’hanno fatto smettere di punto in bianco di curare il Daily Dish ormai oltre un anno e mezzo fa. Per la prima volta, cosa che non fece nemmeno nel blog di commiato ai suoi lettori, racconta i veri motivi che l’hanno spinto alla scelta:

If the internet killed you, I used to joke, then I would be the first to find out. Years later, the joke was running thin. In the last year of my blogging life, my health began to give out. Four bronchial infections in 12 months had become progressively harder to kick. Vacations, such as they were, had become mere opportunities for sleep. My dreams were filled with the snippets of code I used each day to update the site. My friendships had atrophied as my time away from the web dwindled. My doctor, dispensing one more course of antibiotics, finally laid it on the line: “Did you really survive HIV to die of the web?”

Attraverso il racconto dei dieci giorni passati alla Insight Meditation Society di Barre, Massachussets, Sulivan arriva ad una conclusione amara sull’epoca delle enormi distrazioni che tutti stiamo vivendo. Una conclusione che, se ci pensiamo, può persino apparire banale nelle sue motivazioni. La speranza è che, arrivando da quel pulpito da cui arriva, il messaggio riesca a passare. Pur tra le mille distrazioni cui siamo sottoposti:

There are books to be read; landscapes to be walked; friends to be with; life to be fully lived. And I realize that this is, in some ways, just another tale in the vast book of human frailty. But this new epidemic of distraction is our civilization’s specific weakness. And its threat is not so much to our minds, even as they shape-shift under the pressure. The threat is to our souls. At this rate, if the noise does not relent, we might even forget we have any.
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