Now more than ever we need more Girls Who Code

Reshma Saujani
Aug 24, 2017 · 2 min read

In the past five years, Girls Who Code has reached 40,000 girls in all 50 states. For context, there were only 40,000 Computer Science graduates in the US last year. And of those 40,000 graduates, only 7,000 were women. We’re growing the largest pipeline of female engineers, but the only way we can continue to close the gap in tech is by engaging new partners to help create opportunities and access for more girls to code! And, we’ve seen first hand, when you teach a girl to code, you give her the skills to be a change agent and advocate in her community, and the world. These girls use these skills to solve real world problems like homelessness, literacy, cyberbullying, gun violence, and global warming.

That’s why we were thrilled when Uber reached out to us to propose a $1.2 million grant to help expand access to coding to girls through our after-school Clubs nationwide. Their support will help us reach an additional 60,000 girls, providing them with free computer science education and welcoming them into a sisterhood of girls across the US that are using computer science to make a difference. Leading the charge from Uber is Komal Mangtani, a senior director of engineering and sponsor for Uber’s “LadyEng” internal group.

“We’re proud to join forces with Girls Who Code to build a more diverse tech community in the coming years and beyond,” Mangtani said.

In addition to having the support and (emoji-fist bump) of Uber’s LadyEng group to steward this partnership, we’re thrilled that Uber’s new Chief Brand Officer, Bozoma Saint John, will be joining the Girls Who Code Board of Directors, helping us to shape the future of the tech community.

Girls Who Code

Conversations on closing the gender gap in tech

Reshma Saujani

Written by

Founder & CEO @GirlsWhoCode. Activist. NYT Best Selling Author. Former Deputy Public Advocate. Mom @toddlershaan @stanleythepuppy. Wife @nihalmehta.

Girls Who Code

Conversations on closing the gender gap in tech