JAMES FRANCO AND MAGGIE GYLLENHAAL STAR IN HBO DRAMA SERIES THE DEUCE, CREATED BY DAVID SIMON AND GEORGE PELECANOS, DEBUTING SEPT. 10

THE DEUCE chronicles that moment in time when sex went from being a backalley, brown-paper-bag commodity to a billion-dollar universal in American life, a moment when ground zero for the earliest pioneers in the flesh trade was the midtown heart of the nation’s largest city, New York’s Times Square.

Titled after the local slang for New York’s fabled 42nd Street and starring James Franco and Maggie Gyllenhaal, THE DEUCE begins its eight-episode season SUNDAY, SEPT. 10 (9:00–10:20 p.m. ET/PT), followed by other episodes subsequent Sundays at the same time. The show created by George Pelecanos and David Simon; George Pelecanos, David Simon, Nina K. Noble and James Franco executive produce.

Photo: James Franco
Photos (L-R): Maggie Gyllenhaal; Chris Bauer; Gbenga Akinnagbe
Photos (L-R): Michael Rispoli; Lawrence Gilliard, Jr.; Emily Meade
Photos (L-R): James Franco, Chris Coy, James Franco; Jamie Neumann; Maggie Gyllenhaal. Emily Meade (Credit for all: Paul Schiraldi/HBO). Please note these are promotional photos for press only.

THE DEUCE follows the rise of the porn culture in New York from the early 1970s through the mid-1980s, exploring the rough-and-tumble world of the sex trade from the moment when both a liberalizing cultural revolution in American sexuality and new legal definitions of obscenity created a billion-dollar industry that is now an elemental component of the American cultural landscape. Beginning in 1971, the show follows a cast of barkeeps, prostitutes, pimps, police and nightlife denizens as they swirl through a world of sex, crime, high times and violence and the porn business begins its climb from Mafia-backed massage parlors and film labs to legitimacy and cultural permanence.

“For America, flesh as a legal commodity begins in New York City, but it travels everywhere into the national life,” says Simon. “The fact is, we don’t sell a luxury car, blue jeans or bottle of beer anymore without a certain amount of pornographic thought attached.”

While THE DEUCE is structured as a fictional narrative, it results from research by producer Marc Henry Johnson, who chronicled the rise and fall of the sex industry and The Deuce demimonde through the lives of a pair of real-life twins who eventually became Mob fronts for the Gambino family in midtown, rising to some prominence in their own right. Those tales — provided by a brother who passed away a few brief months before THE DEUCE began filming its pilot — form one essential strand in the narrative, augmented by additional research and subsequent interviews with other surviving participants who consulted on the scripts.

Photos (L-R): Tariq Trotter, Gary Carr; Margarita Leviera.
Photos (L-R): Natalie Paul, Dominique Fishback; Pernell Walker, James Franco, Maggie Gyllenhaal (Credit for all: Paul Schiraldi/HBO). Please note these are promotional photos for press use only.

Says Pelecanos, “Times Square in the 1970s is now chiefly remembered as the ground zero of decadence and depravity, but what’s often left out of the picture is that, for many, it was a hotbed of experimentation, adventure and sexual liberation. The music, the outlandish outfits, beautiful cars made in Detroit, and particularly the decade’s timecapsule, shot-in-New York films (“Mean Streets,” “The French Connection,” “Black Caesar”) were a great inspiration for us when we were designing the look and feel of our debut season of THE DEUCE.”

In addition to their work on “The Wire,” creators David Simon and George Pelecanos also collaborated on HBO’s New Orleans drama “Treme.” Simon is an author, journalist and producer whose other works for HBO include “The Corner,” “Generation Kill” and “Show Me a Hero.” Pelecanos is the author of 20 critically acclaimed novels, including “The Double” and “The Turnaround,” as well as a screenwriter and film producer. He served as a writer and co-producer on HBO’s “The Pacific.”

Also writing for the series are three other acclaimed novelists, co-executive producer Richard Price, Megan Abbott and Lisa Lutz. An accomplished screenwriter as well, Price (“Lush Life,” “Clockers”) wrote and executive produced HBO’s “The Night Of” and previously worked with Simon and Pelecanos on “The Wire.” Abbott is the author of nine books, including “Dare Me,” “The Fever” and “You Will Know Me.” Lutz is the author of nine novels, including “The Passenger,” “How to Start a Fire,” the Spellman series of novels and “Heads You Lose,” co-authored with David Hayward.

Additional writing credits on the series include Will Ralston (“Treme”), Chris Yakaitis (“Treme”) and Marc Henry Johnson.

The cast includes: James Franco (Oscar® nominee for “127 Hours”) as identical twin brothers Vincent and Frankie Martino; Maggie Gyllenhaal (Oscar® nominee for “Crazy Heart”) as self-made prostitute Candy; Gary Carr (“Downton Abbey”) as pimp C.C.; Margarita Levieva (“The Blacklist”) as college student-turned-barmaid Abigail “Abby” Parker; Lawrence Gilliard, Jr. (HBO’s “The Wire”) as police officer Chris Alston; Dominique Fishback (HBO’s “Show Me a Hero”) as prostitute Darlene; Emily Meade (HBO’s “The Leftovers”) as 20-year-old prostitute Lori; Gbenga Akinnagbe (“The Good Wife”) as pimp Larry Brown; Chris Bauer (HBO’s “The Wire”) as Bobby Dwyer, a construction foreman and brother-in-law of the Martinos; Chris Coy (CINEMAX’s “Banshee”) as bartender Paul Hendrickson; Natalie Paul (HBO’s “Show Me a Hero”) as reporter Sandra Washington; and Michael Rispoli (HBO’s “The Sopranos”) as mafia captain Rudy Pipilo.

Vincent Martino (James Franco) is a successful and astute barman with a knack for promotion who finds himself — with increasing reluctance — in the center of the city sex trade after he attracts the interest of a well-connected mob player, Rudy Pipilo (Michael Rispoli). A Gambino captain, Rudy represents that New York family’s financial interests in the midtown sex business. After Abby Parker (Margarita Levieva) drops out of NYU, she and Vincent begin a relationship that ultimately challenges them both. Vince’s identical twin brother Frankie is Vincent’s freewheeling, free-spirited counterpart, who gets by on his brother’s support but is increasingly drawn toward Pipilo’s business interests.

Candy (Maggie Gyllenhaal) works as an independent prostitute, refusing to work under any of the multitude of street pimps who control much of the trade along Eighth and Ninth Avenues. She has a son who lives with her parents in the suburbs, but her ambition and intelligence — as well as a weariness with street life — lead her to the emerging porn business, where she sees potential for herself and, perhaps, her fellow streetwalkers.

Darlene (Dominique Fishback), a young but street-smart woman from North Carolina, uses her savvy to manage her volatile pimp, Larry Brown (Gbenga Akinnagbe), while Lori (Emily Meade), a 20-year-old fresh off a Greyhound from Minnesota, is taken into the fold of dapper pimp C.C. (Gary Carr) immediately upon her arrival at Port Authority. C.C. is equally capable of charm and brutality in managing his prostitutes, while Larry Brown controls his stable — Darlene, Loretta (Sepideh Moafi) and Barbara (Kayla Foster) — largely through intimidation.

Chris Alston (Lawrence Gilliard, Jr.) is a cop on midtown beat who questions his superiors’ methods, if not the entire premise of trying to police the sex trade amid a culture of unrelenting demand for sex and institutional corruption within the New York Police Department. When told to stop policing a particular swath of his precinct, just west of Times Square, Alston starts a quiet inquiry that brings him together with Sandra Washington (Natalie Paul), an aspiring reporter who is probing the sex industry. Meanwhile, bartender Paul (Chris Coy) inherited by Vincent Martino as he takes over a Mob-backed midtown bar, traverses the early years of the increasingly open postStonewall culture of gay New York, all with an eye to running a nightspot of his own. All these storylines merge as some of the streetwalkers, excited by the prospect and promise of stardom, find new work amid the rapid acceleration in pornographic production in New York.

Michelle MacLaren (“Breaking Bad,” HBO’s “Game of Thrones”), an executive producer on the pilot, directs the first and last episodes of the season. Star and executive producer James Franco directs two episodes.

“James directed two well-crafted episodes while simultaneously playing twin brothers — no small feat,” says executive producer Nina K. Noble. “He took the concept of cloning one’s self to a whole new level.”

Longtime Simon, Pelecanos and Noble collaborators Ernest Dickerson, Uta Briesewitz, Alex Hall and Roxann Dawson also direct episodes of THE DEUCE.

The series will also be available on HBO NOW, HBO GO, HBO On Demand and affiliate portals. THE DEUCE was created by David Simon and George Pelecanos; executive producers, David Simon, George Pelecanos, Nina K. Noble, James Franco; co-executive producer, Richard Price; producers, Marc Henry Johnson, Maggie Gyllenhaal.

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