My Wedding Wasn’t A Guarantee of Happily Ever After

A wedding can include hundreds of people, but a marriage is between two.

Sandi Parsons
Heart Affairs
Published in
4 min readFeb 1, 2021

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Photo by Alexandra Gorn on Unsplash

“Come on, it's not a funeral march.”

My stepdad gripped my arm and marched me across the bridge. In my brand-new shiny heels, I could barely keep up. As my family crowded in, my extremely camera-shy stepdad disappeared, leaving me to deal with my snap-happy relatives and walk the last few meters on my own.

My first wedding came with all the bells and whistles — well, the bells and whistles we could afford.

We were young, lacking a well-paid income, and with a three-month-old baby. But, working on our budget, with help from our parents, we squeezed in my dress, the bridesmaid dresses, rented tuxedos, and flowers.

We adhered to traditions. My first husband had a buck’s night, we slept at separate locations before the big event, and I dressed according to the rhyme:

Something old, something new.
Something borrowed, something blue.

I walked across a bridge in the park and got married in front of a hundred family and friends.

Because that’s what you’re supposed to do when you get married, isn’t it? Marriage is a celebration, and like any good celebration, it…

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Sandi Parsons
Heart Affairs

Sandi Parsons lives & breathes stories as a reader, writer, and storyteller📚 Kidlit specialist, dipping her toes in the big kid’s pool.