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The threat below Mount St. Helens

Forty years after the mountain’s eruption, officials struggle to balance research and risk.

Washington State University Vancouver biologist John Bishop leads students on a trail through wildflowers to his research plots on the Pumice Plain of Mount St. Helens. He has studied life on the plain since 1990, 10 years after the 1980 eruption left the landscape dry and barren. | Courtney Talak/The Daily News

The Pumice Plain in southwest Washington’s Mount St. Helens National Volcanic Monument is one of the most closely studied patches of land in the world. Named for the type of volcanic rock that dominates it, it formed during the mountain’s 1980 eruption. Since then, ecologists have scrutinized it, surveying birds, mammals and plants, and in general cataloging the return of life to this unique and fragile landscape.

Now, the depth of that attention is threatened, but not due to the stirrings of the most active volcano in the Pacific Northwest. The problem is a large lake two miles north of the mountain: Spirit Lake. Or, more specifically, the Spirit Lake tunnel, an artificial outlet built out of necessity and completed in 1985.

After nearly four decades, the tunnel is in need of an upgrade. At issue is the road the Forest Service plans to build across the Pumice Plain despite the scientific plots dotting the plain’s expanse. In this, Spirit Lake and its tunnel have become the de facto headwaters of a struggle over how best to manage research and risk on a mountain famous for its destructive capabilities.

Read more: https://www.hcn.org/issues/52.5/north-scientific-research-the-threat-below-mount-st-helens

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High Country News

High Country News

Working to inform and inspire people — through in-depth journalism — to act on behalf of the West’s diverse natural and human communities.