Tide Pool: A Sensory Collage of Ebb and Flow

High Museum of Art
Sep 4 · 4 min read

Welcome to Tide Pool — a series of multimedia blog posts meant to immerse you in a headspace of creativity and inspiration.

By Eva Berlin, Digital Content Specialist, High Museum of Art

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Jim Frazer (American, born 1949), Water and Rocks, 1971

In a tide pool — that special space at the ocean’s edge — life exists at the mercy of the tides. At high tide, the waves come crashing down, pounding everything that dares to make a life there. While battering the rocks and carrying in predators, the waves also bathe the area with nourishing seawater and organisms. At low tide, the waves slink back, revealing what’s left behind, gleaming, facing off with the sun.

It’s a harsh environment, but it’s also a vibrant place of flourishing for the organisms that manage to cling to the rocks.

Saturated blue pages of an art book accordion out, zigzagging across the photo.
Saturated blue pages of an art book accordion out, zigzagging across the photo.
Meghann Riepenhoff (American, born 1979), Eluvium, 2012

Tide pools remind me of this historic time we’re in, a moment carved out by forces outside of our control. We are tested by sickness, injustice, and isolation. In spite of these struggles, we do our best to survive — and maybe even thrive. Some things born of this time of upheaval will latch on and endure for the better.

This new quarterly series is a collection of those glittering bits of life that emerge and remain, cemented in our collective conscience. You’ll meet staff members and get to peer into their headspaces. What artworks are inspiring you? What are you reading? How are you feeling? What topics are leading you down rabbit holes? What are you listening to?

In this mood board of sorts, enjoy a collage of images, words, and sounds intended to spark your creative mind.

Saturated blue pages of an art book accordion out, zigzagging across the photo.
Saturated blue pages of an art book accordion out, zigzagging across the photo.
Meghann Riepenhoff (American, born 1979), Eluvium, 2012

In My Tide Pool: Ebb and Flow

Look.
Look.
A clear glass vase with intaglio carving and watery patterns of blue and green swirling around a female figure.
A clear glass vase with intaglio carving and watery patterns of blue and green swirling around a female figure.
Bowl, ca. 1895, Émile Gallé (French, 1846–1904), designer; Charles Moore (American, 1931­–2010)
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Edward Moran (American, 1829–1901), Off Norman’s Woe, 1872
Listen.
Listen.
Read.
Read.

. . . may you
open your eyes to water
water waving forever
and may you in your innocence
sail through this to that

— Lucille Clifton, “blessing the boats”

Read the full poem on the Poetry Foundation website.

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Lucinda Bunnen (American, born 1930), Ceramic Water Jugs, 2007; Sicilian Vase, 1878–1880, Mount Washington Glass Company
Consider.
Consider.

“The man who never alters his opinion is like standing water, & breeds reptiles of the mind.”

— William Blake, The Marriage of Heaven and Hell

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Ellsworth Kelly (American, 1923–2015), The River (State), 2003
Breathe.
Breathe.

Take a long bath. Go for a swim. Notice the water; observe how it moves. Float, and consider how you might feel if you emulated water and took the path of least resistance. Let thoughts and feelings wash over you and flow by. Inhale slowly to the count of four, filling your lungs and then abdomen. Hold the breath for a count of four. Exhale for the same time, expelling all the air inside you. Repeat.

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Clarence John Laughlin (American, 1905–1985), Water Witch, 1939, printed 1940; Meghann Riepenhoff (American, born 1979), Littoral Drift Nearshore #649 (Bainbridge Island, WA 02.21.18, Scattered Storms and Fog), 2018
Dive In.
Dive In.
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Thomas Struth, Nature & Politics (2016), on sale for $30.99 at the Museum Shop

Artwork inspiration found at High.org/explore. Explore over seventeen thousand artworks and find your inspiration.


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High Museum of Art

Stories from the High Museum of Art in Atlanta

High Museum of Art

Written by

The High is Atlanta’s art museum, bringing creativity to your everyday. Our collections, exhibitions, and programs are always here for you.

High Museum of Art

Stories from the High Museum of Art in Atlanta

High Museum of Art

Written by

The High is Atlanta’s art museum, bringing creativity to your everyday. Our collections, exhibitions, and programs are always here for you.

High Museum of Art

Stories from the High Museum of Art in Atlanta

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