The liquid light projectionists known as EO Lightshow. Photo by Jake Hirshland.

Meet The Artists of Warble Daze: Chatting with Women & LGBT Creatives

Get to know some of the artists who will be exhibiting October 13 & 14 at Logan Square Auditorium

by Katie Ingegneri


Warble Daze is shaping up to be the Chicago DIY showcase of the year, featuring not only a ton of amazing bands, but talented local artists as well, who operate in a variety of mediums — from creating the show posters you see around town, to comics, zines, and liquid live light projections. I sent some interview questions to some of the women & LGBT-identifying artists who will be selling and exhibiting their work on October 13 and 14 at Logan Square Auditorium about their backgrounds as artists and creators, what inspires them, and what they love about the Chicago DIY scene — plus who they’re looking forward to seeing at Warble Daze! Check out examples of their work and be sure to come out to one or both days this weekend!


Illustration by Brooke Lord

Brooke Lord, Spaceburger Comix (October 14)

Spaceburger Comix is a comic book series set in an alternate, sci-fi universe that parallels the current landscape of the city of Chicago. Spaceburger Comix is an in-depth investigation into the subcultures that are unique to the city of Chicago, such as the various music and “underground” DIY scenes. In short, Spaceburger Comix can be summed up as space, aliens, and rock ‘n roll; however, at the core, the comic series serves to explore critical concepts of community, idolization, “groupie” culture, narcism, media, 80’s and 90’s aesthetics.

Where are you based?

I’m currently based in Chicago for school, I go to SAIC.

What is your background in making art?

I’ve been making art my entire life, since I could hold a pen and paper really. Right now I am a third year undergraduate at SAIC, and I’m mostly interested in comics and animation. I also have a background in painting and drawing, which I still practice, but right now it’s mainly comics for me.

What kind of medium do you work most in?

My mediums really vary since I’m interested in different areas of study. For comics, I mostly use gelly roll pens and india ink; for painting I use oil paint; and for animation I use the same mediums I use for comics, as well as 35mm film photos.

Comic by Brooke Lord

What inspires you to create?

Honestly, I feel like almost everything I come into contact with influences my work. A lot of what inspires my comics is everyday interactions that either I have, or that I observe. For painting, I’m currently interested in the cityscape of downtown Chicago. Also, I read 1–800 Mice by Matthew Thurber, and Ghost World by Daniel Clowes this summer, which have been influencing my art and ideas as well.

What is your favorite thing about the Chicago DIY art & music scene?

My favorite thing about the DIY scene in Chicago is the community and platform it gives to smaller and emerging artists, and the ability to meet other creative people from different backgrounds. Since getting involved with the local DIY scenes in Chicago, I have been lucky enough to collaborate with some really talented artists I look up to, as well as having had opportunities to show my own artwork. About two years ago, I had some of my original Spaceburger Comix drawings (before it was even that), shown at The Dojo. That was such an invaluable experience because it really helped build my confidence in showing artwork, as well as networking and meeting other practicing artists. Since then, I have shown my artwork at Schuba’s a year ago, and I’ve also had the opportunities to collaborate with Paul Cherry, The Walters, and White Mystery.

Brooke Lord’s tour posters for Paul Cherry and White Mystery.

How will you be participating in Warble Daze?

For Warble Daze, I have a table for Spaceburger Comix, where I’ll be selling a bunch of comics and zines. I’m so excited to finally be releasing the very first issue of Spaceburger Comix called “The Party of No Return,” which was inspired by a Halloween party that was hosted by Feeltrip records two years ago.

What band are you most looking forward to seeing at Warble Daze?

That’s a hard question! All of the local bands are really great live performances, I always have a lot of fun seeing Yoko & the Oh No’s, Cafe Racer, and Modern Vices. I think I’m the most excited to see Acid Dad since I haven’t seen them live yet, but I’m excited to see all of the bands.

Check out Brooke’s video animation paying tribute to DIY space Wally’s World below.


Poster by Mattie Hamilton

Mattie Hamilton (October 13)

Where are you based?

I’m originally from Texas, but I fell head-over-heels in love with Chicago’s music scene after a brief visit in 2013. I promised myself I’d come back someday and dive in headfirst. After nearly two years spent as part of [DIY venue] Charm School, I now divide my time between creating freelance art for musicians and venues all over the city and working at The Empty Bottle.

What is your background in making art?

At some point in college, my education in creative advertising collided with my showgoings. College radio was my safe haven (bless up KVRX) and somewhere in the midst of designing posters for fellow DJs’ radio shows, I realized I could maybe actually kind of make a sort of career out of making art for music.

What kind of medium do you work most in?

My personal art style is a blend of hand-drawing and digital coloring. This doesn’t work for every artist and genre, so the amount of digital intervention present in each of my pieces depends entirely on what works best for the artist’s style.

Poster by Mattie Hamilton

What inspires you to create?

Because my art promotes other artists first and foremost, each piece I create is inspired by the names emblazoned on my posters. For one, The Cell Phones draw their themes and aesthetic from cliché 80s movie posters, so that’s exactly the sort of poster I created for them. Because Growing Concerns complements their poetry with earth tones and lush greenery, I drew the steps of a house I love in Bucktown that’s covered in plants. Likewise, because Warble Daze itself boasts a predominantly psych and garage lineup, I’ve drawn from the likes of 60’s psychedelic art for the event’s poster. Transposing sounds into graphic art is always exciting because I’m not restricted to my default art style.

Poster by Mattie Hamilton

What is your favorite thing about the Chicago DIY art & music scene?

The overlap between Chicago’s arts community and its activist community is impossible to ignore. In our current political climate, it’s so important that we as artists use our work to make statements whenever possible. They don’t have to be overt — if you’re going to put a woman on your poster, why not a woman of color? If you’re going to draw a bunch of buildings, why not reference the ruthlessness of gentrification while you’re at it? Why not sell your art to raise money for hurricane victims? The possibilities are endless. Silence is violence, and the pen is mightier than the sword.

How will you be participating in Warble Daze?

I’ll be selling commemorative prints of the Warble Daze event poster as well as tons of other posters I’ve done for the DIY scene over the past couple of years. There’s rolls & rolls of leftover posters from past events lying around my apartment and I’m excited to break ’em back out.

What band are you most looking forward to seeing at Warble Daze?

There’s nothing like the energy in the room when No Men performs. I’ve never seen them in such a large space, so I’m excited to see what they do with it!


From Disappearing Media’s FB page

Jen Dot, Disappearing Media (October 13)

Where are you based?

Currently working in Chicago, but I see Disappearing Media as a project that can exist anywhere as I, hopefully, take some life adventures in the next few years.

What is your background in making art?

I’ve always done it, it’s been an important outlet for me. I have a degree in Creative Writing, I play in bands, and I illustrate comics. I hope to get my MFA in writing in the next 5 years or so.

What kind of medium do you work most in?

Writing is my main outlet — it informs my songwriting and my comics.

What inspires you to create?

Everything — good bad. I try to allow my emotions to guide me through the process.

What is your favorite thing about the Chicago DIY art & music scene?

I love the supportive people, the ones that come up to say you inspired them to do this or that; I love the authentic people, the ones who make art to find themselves; I love the generosity of space, people who ask you to play in theirs and treat you well while you are there. It’s all so important to fostering a loving, caring community. I love people who listen to expressions, who show up to events to grow as people and artists as well as show support.

How will you be participating in Warble Daze?

I will be selling newspapers and zines and also summoning folks to preorder our first card game! I will have a little table set up to play the game. I will have some prints of my collages / poetry and comics, as well.

www.disappearingmedia.com

Pearl Charles with EO Lightshow projections. Photo by Steve (@ssymphoto on Instagram)

Emily Schexnayder & Olivia Oyamada, EO Lightshow (October 14)


Where are you based?

We are based in Logan Square in Chicago! We actually live 3 doors down from each other on either side of the 606.

What is your background in making art? What kind of medium do you work most in?

We both have different backgrounds in art but mostly self-taught experimentation with different mediums all the time. Emily grew up working with her parents who are sculptors, designers, and screen printers. Olive does illustrative work and graphic design for different bands. Music plays a really big role in our lives, so naturally, we got into the artistic branches of music. We first art-bonded over hand stitch embroidering and fiber work. The first time we went to a liquid light show was at Levitation Austin in 2015, how we met, and we both were like “what IS that!” We began to collaborate with liquid light live projections about a year and a half ago.

Photo by Rachel Zyzda

What inspires you to create?

We are both deeply rooted in musical culture in different ways, and so in spending time within the Chicago music scene, this is a culmination of our histories and experiences and current interpretation of our own art as well as the beautiful art scene in Chicago that we are surrounded by. We are inspired to illustrate the music. We prepare our work based on our own artistic ideas, and the show itself is a live response to the music we hear. The best feeling you get in a light show is when you relax and are having fun with the audience and the band, because it makes us all feel connected. How do we say this without sounding like total hippies: Live liquid light has a way of breaking down barriers and letting everyone really jam out, and it feels great.

Photo by Alec Basse

What is your favorite thing about the Chicago DIY art & music scene?

Our favorite part of the DIY art and music scene is the nature of it. We love seeing people collaborate with their creativity over their desire to express themselves and share that with others. We like the community that it creates.

How will you be participating in Warble Daze?

Our participation in Warble Daze will be as liquid light show projectionists. We will be making live projections using analog and digital mediums to create a fun and immersive visual extension of the music.

Photo by Max Barkley

What band are you most looking forward to seeing at Warble Daze?

We are most looking forward to seeing The Nude Party because we like to listen to them when we practice, they are some of our buds, they have new music, and they are a blast to see live. We are also really looking forward to Steelism and Acid Dad as well as all of the Chicago babies!

Photo by Rachel Zyzda


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