This Week in Women’s Rights 2017–10–16

Scott Douglas Jacobsen

“Canada’s Prime Minister Justin Trudeau on Friday urged Mexican lawmakers to improve women’s rights, delivering a sharp rebuke to a key trading partner that has struggled to curb years of femicide, drug violence and rights abuses.

In a visit to the Mexican capital amid tense talks in the United States to save the North American Free Trade Agreement (NAFTA), Trudeau met human rights organizations that briefed him on the violence and challenges faced by many of the country’s women.

In an address at the Mexican Senate, Trudeau told lawmakers that the stories he had heard from the rights groups about the treatment of women were “unacceptable,” and pressed for gender imbalances to be addressed in an updated NAFTA.”


“Mexico supports the move to address inequality and the treatment of women.

In the second day of his first official visit to Mexico, the Canadian Prime Minister Justin Trudeau has urged lawmakers to improve women’s rights by adding a new clause to North American Free Trade Agreement, NAFTA.

Addressing the Mexican Senate, Trudeau said “I challenge you to use your position and power to strongly push for the rights of women and girls in Mexico..We must move the needle forward on gender inequality.”

Trudeau said the stories he had heard from the rights groups about the treatment of women were “unacceptable,” and pressed for imbalances to be checked in a gender chapter within NAFTA, a move supported by Mexico.”


“Sima Wali, who fled the Soviet-backed coup in Afghanistan in 1978 to wage what she called a “jihad for peace and equality” by women against “gender apartheid” imposed by the Communists and then by the Taliban, died on Sept. 22 at her home in Falls Church, Va. She was 66.

The cause was multiple system atrophy, a rare neurological disease, her nephew Suleiman Wali said.

Ms. Wali had worked for the American Embassy and the Peace Corps in Afghanistan in her 20s before the 1978 coup. She then settled in Washington, where she became a United States citizen and organized Refugee Women in Development, an advocacy group, now dissolved, that sought to empower victims of war and genocide.”


“(CNN)Two simple words became a rallying cry on Twitter to stand against sexual harassment and assault.

“Me too.”

Social media was flooded with messages Sunday, mostly from women, who tagged their profiles to indicate that they have been sexually harassed or assaulted.

On Sunday actress Alyssa Milano tweeted a note that read “Suggested by a friend: If all the women who have been sexually harassed or assaulted wrote “Me too” as a status, we might give people a sense of the magnitude of the problem.”

“If you’ve been sexually harassed or assaulted write ‘me too’ as a reply to this tweet,” she wrote.”


“As women around the world come forward with stories of sexual harassment, a report by the Thomson Reuters Foundation shows that Cairo is the world’s most dangerous megacity for women, and has become more perilous since the 2011 uprisings.

Cairo established itself as a city often unsafe for women in 2011 with a series of high-profile sexual assaults in Tahrir Square. Since then, the situation has only grown worse, according to a pollconducted by the Thomson Reuters Foundation. In a survey of experts looking at how well women are protected from sexual violence, harmful cultural practices, access to healthcare and financial independence, Cairo came in last of 19 megacities those housing 10 million people or more behind Delhi, Karachi and Kinshasa.

Women in Cairo are subjected to harassment on a daily basis, experts said. Since 2011, economic conditions in the Egyptian capital and throughout the nation have deteriorated. High unemployment means fewer opportunities for women to gain financial independence, as well as a glut of frustrated, jobless men, particularly among the young. The poor economy also means that health services in the country have worsened.”