I’ve been blogging for 8 freaking years.

Here’s what I learned as I went along.



Sorry, America, you’ve been replaced with computers.
Just put your stuff out there.
Somebody will like it. True fact.
There are people out there who GET you.
And your voice will call out to them, and somehow, connect. It’s wild.
People will steal everything you do.
Whatever: you can have more ideas. They apparently can’t.
Don’t be afraid of your own voice.
It’s the only one you have (unless you write fiction).
Whatever you say, someone will be offended.
Whatever.
Creative habits are healthy.
Drawing a little graph every day helps me think better.
It doesn’t matter if nobody reads it.
It feels good to share ideas, even if you’re just shouting into void
(see the rise of twitter).
The tools change, the actions don’t.
The next big platform or algorithm or whatever is just another way for you to talk to the people who GET you.
Most people can’t write very well.
Try to read between the typos and find the emotion in their messages.
That’s what matters.
You have to make time to make things.
And it’s worth it to find it and protect it.
The vast majority of people don’t make content, they just pass it on.
So the things you make are more valuable than you think.
Most people are wonderful.
The internet is less than .0005% perverts and haters.
There’s plenty of room (and money) on the internet for everyone.
Share your ideas and contacts and leads — don’t be stingy with anything.
A tiny bit of success can really snowball, if you let it.
I draw graphs for a job. Consider for a moment how deeply silly that is.
When in doubt, err on the side of fun.
Being overly serious just turns normal life into a stressful gantlet of chores.