Brendan Dawes at fowd 2010 / photo by marc thiele

Don't Tell Me What To Do

I'm a web developer. I like conferences and tech events, so I've been attending a lot of them lately and presenting in some too. I like conferences most for learning from experiences that the presenters have had, and I love when they share what you should do, and shouldn't.

But there is a problem on how some presenters say things that I don't agree, so I will try to put things that, in my humble opinion, are the right (or less wrong?) way to approach and talk to you audience.

It's pretty straightforward: don't tell me what to do.

Your reality doesn't apply to everyone. What is good for you, isn't necessarily good for me or anyone else. There are ways to give advices, and saying that "if you're doing different than me, you're a dick!" isn't a good way to prove your point.

If you don't like something, doesn't mean that it's wrong. It means that from all the ways you can accomplish something, that's the way you don't like that much.

You can share your point of view showing how valuable and all the good points you've reached by doing the way you did, whatever you're trying to convince your audience, and that's valuable. You need to be able to listen to your audience (and I don't mean at the conference, I mean all the time), that probably have someone there that already tried to do what you're showing in the same way you did, but prefer.

So please, be true to yourself. Stop vomiting rules on how people should work and instead, tell us your failures. What you've already did and did not worked. Show you're human. Suggest. Make people trust on what you're saying for what it really means, not just because you have a name and want to be polemic.

Please, don't tell me what to do to, just show me what you did.

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