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COUNTRIES ACROSS THE WORLD PRESS FOR PAID MENSTRUAL LEAVE

COUNTRIES ACROSS THE WORLD PRESS FOR PAID MENSTRUAL LEAVE

Many women experience painful periods around the globe, but only a few countries around the world, and mostly in Asia, allow them to take time off work to rest.

With a new bill released by the government on Tuesday, Spain hopes to be the first Western country to follow its lead, allowing women to take unlimited leave for period pain if they obtain a doctor’s certificate.

The plan comes at a time when there is a global feminist drive to break down taboos around menstruation, but the bill has seen opposition from Spanish unions, who fear that menstrual leaves might not liberate women but may encourage companies to hire males first.

Here is a look at how other countries deal with menstrual leave:

INDONESIA

In 2003, Indonesia passed a law which allows women to take two days of paid menstruation leave every month without them being required to give advance notice.

However, in practice, the provision is optional.

Many employers simply provide one day of menstrual leave every month, while others do not provide any at all, either because they are uninformed of the legislation or because they prefer to ignore it.

The necessity to give women 24 days of menstrual leave on top of their 12 days of yearly leave, according to an International Labour Organization report from 2003, represented an important cost for many businesses, which resulted in the discrimination against women regarding recruiting policies.

JAPAN

Companies must agree to give women menstruation leave if they seek it, for as long as they need it, according to a 1947 regulation in Japan.

It does not, however, compel them to pay women during menstrual leave, but according to a 2020 labour ministry poll, roughly 30% of Japanese enterprises offer full or partial payment.

However, few women make use of the law. Only 0.9 percent of eligible workers have taken menstrual leave, according to a survey of about 6,000 businesses.

SOUTH KOREA

Employers who refuse to give their employees one day of unpaid menstruation leave per month face fines of up to 5 million won ($3,910).

Until 2004, when South Korea switched from a six-day to a five-day work week, the leave was paid.

In a 2018 poll, a little more than 19% of women took time off, which was more than in Japan. Many, however, stated that they are unable to do so due to conservative or unfavourable work settings.

TAIWAN

The Act on Gender Equality in Employment in Taiwan provides women with three days of menstruation leave per year, which are not deducted from the statutory 30 days of sick leave.

In any given month, women can only take one day off.

Workers on menstruation leave, like those on sick leave, only get half their pay.

ZAMBIA

When Zambia approved a rule in 2015 allowing women to take a day off work during their period without giving notice or providing a doctor’s note, it became the envy of other African countries.

Despite the fact that the policy is widely accepted and supported, not all employers gladly comply with the law on “Mother’s Day.”

Women are beginning to use their rights, thanks to labour unions, Ruth Kanyanga Kamwi, a communications expert and women’s rights campaigner, told AFP.

AUSTRALIA, INDIA, FRANCE: COMPANIES LEAD THE WAY

Some businesses did not wait when they were legally required to give women menstrual leave.

The Victorian Women’s Trust, an Australian gender equality organisation, provides employees with 12 days of menstrual and menopause leave; Zomato, an Indian food delivery startup, provides 10 days of period leave; and La Collective, a French company, gives women one day of period leave per month.

Many women experience painful periods around the globe, but only a few countries around the world, and mostly in Asia, allow them to take time off work to rest.

With a new bill released by the government on Tuesday, Spain hopes to be the first Western country to follow its lead, allowing women to take unlimited leave for period pain if they obtain a doctor’s certificate.

The plan comes at a time when there is a global feminist drive to break down taboos around menstruation, but the bill has seen opposition from Spanish unions, who fear that menstrual leaves might not liberate women but may encourage companies to hire males first.

by ichhori.com Reference: ichhori.com

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