Why We Should Design For Humans, Not Users

People’s lives aren’t static, so why are their user experiences?

Rohini Vibha
Oct 11, 2016 · 4 min read

After my injury, I asked, “How might brands design experiences that ebb and flow with people’s lives?”

How can a company or brand be there for people when they need a break? An athletic company for injured athletes is one scenario, and there are countless others: airlines when people can’t travel, utilities providers when people go on long vacations, and banks when people are experiencing financial hardship, to name a few. And how about when people experience a significant change in life altogether, like marriages, new jobs, births, or moves?

3 ways that business can create on-going relationships:

  1. Maintain a continuous conversation

Today, most brands create end-to-end experiences that assume their users have consistent lives.

For example, building a great end-to-end experience for finding and completing one daily workout or selecting and purchasing the right pair of shoes for one occasion. This is a good start, but the problem is that we as humans don’t lead lives of repeatable moments. Each day our behaviors and emotions are different, sometimes predictably, and sometimes unpredictably so. And our lives change over the weeks, months, and years. An app experience that meets our needs one day may be completely off the next.

IDEO Stories

"It doesn't occur to most people that everything is designed" - Bill Moggridge

Thanks to Misa Misono.

Rohini Vibha

Written by

I like to play with words. Business Designer @IDEO. Read more on unabridgedro.com.

IDEO Stories

"It doesn't occur to most people that everything is designed" - Bill Moggridge