From the ‘bullshit curation’ to the decline of newspapers (feat. John Oliver)

edited by Marco Nurra


  • The art of good headline writing and image selection in order to get someone to click and go to a website is usually called “clickbaiting,” but Aaron Loeb thinks we should call it “bullshit curation.” He’s got a point:
  • Facebook removes potential police brutality evidence too readily, activists say. While it’s no secret that law enforcement is increasingly relying on social media to conduct investigations, shutting down accounts presents a different set of questions. Some have called for Facebook to appoint a public editor to review users’ concerns about civil rights issues, and many are demanding greater transparency about how, when, and why Facebook decides to comply with law enforcement’s requests.
  • In the ad-blocking war, publishers gain an important ally in Facebook. On Tuesday, Facebook promised to be world’s only publisher selling 100% viewability, 100% identifiable users, no ad-blockers. Unfortunately, Adblock Plus has already defeated Facebook’s new ad-blocking restrictions. But, it’s not that simple... Andrew Bosworth, the VP of product and business for Facebook, pointed out that the Adblock Plus software was now not just blocking ads but also removing posts from friends and family of users as well. Let’s see what happens next.

“When someone hilariously and poignantly celebrates the industry that you are paid to defend and protect, you ought to laugh at the funny parts and then simply say ‘thank you.’ Or maybe nothing at all.”

  • Charlie Beckett is not on the same page: “I think that the high moral view of journalist/comedian John Oliver about journalism is part of the problem. […] The trouble with that approach is that trying to get people to fund good journalism out of guilt or civic duty turns journalism into a charity. Good luck with that. It won’t work.” Here’s the complete post:
  • For news, this is the perfect storm —according to Frederic Filloux — It combines the triumph of superficiality over depth and substance, the acceleration of the news cycle, the decline of media that used to provide necessary checks and balance and, for good measure, the spectacular economic imbalance between new and old media players.”

International Journalism Festival is the biggest annual media event in Europe. It’s an open invitation to interact with the best of world journalism. All sessions are free entry for all attendees, all venues are situated in the stunning setting of the historic town centre of Perugia.

⚡ ijf weekly roundup

International Journalism Festival is the biggest annual media event in Europe. It's an open invitation to interact with the best of world journalism. All sessions are free entry for all attendees. Come and join us!

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International Journalism Festival #ijf20 | 14th edition | 1–5 April 2020 | Watch #ijf19 on-demand: media.journalismfestival.com

⚡ ijf weekly roundup

International Journalism Festival is the biggest annual media event in Europe. It's an open invitation to interact with the best of world journalism. All sessions are free entry for all attendees. Come and join us!