Social platforms and journalism: a weird relationship

Our personal weekly selection about journalism and innovation. Join the conversation on Facebook and Twitter.

edited by Marco Nurra


  • It’s been about 10 months since Facebook launched Instant Articles with a small group of titles, and in a couple of months the fast-loading articles format will be opened up to all of them. Also, Facebook is letting publishers use Instant Articles to collect email newsletter signups. Digiday explains how The Washington Post, Slate and other publishers are using this platform.
  • Google Digital News Initiative will award more than €27 million to 128 journalism projects in Europe as part of the first round of funding, which aims to stimulate innovation among European news media outlets.
    🔊 We’ll tackle this topic at ‪#‎ijf16‬:

📅 “Google Digital News Initiative: promoting innovation and high quality in digital journalism”, with Ludovic Blecher, Madhav Chinnappa and Isabelle Sonnenfeld

  • PBS launches a new immersive documentary on Facebook 360, transporting viewers to war-torn South Sudan where more than 2.8 million people are suffering a hunger crisis, and nearly 40,000 are on the brink of starvation.
  • Platforms are becoming more powerful rather than less — Facebook already accounts for a huge proportion of the web traffic to major media sites. And publishers are rushing even further into its embrace because they have no choice and can’t think of a better option. The long-term repercussions of this surrender are unclear,” according to Mathew Ingram.
    🔊 We’ll tackle this topic at ‪#‎ijf16‬:

📅 “Journalism and Silicon Valley”, with Trushar Barot, Emily Bell, Madhav Chinnappa, Mathew Ingram and Craig Silverman

  • In battle with Google and Facebook, more publishers join forces. The two tech giants alone will control 51 percent of digital ad revenue in the U.S. this year. The common threats facing the industry have made partnering up with competitors an easier sell.
Recep Tayyip Erdoğan, President of Turkey
  • Turkey silences independent broadcaster this week. Riot police has used tear gas and water cannons on protesters during a raid on the country’s largest newspaper after a seizure order, Reuters reported. The ongoing deterioration in Turkey’s press freedom has been well documented by Index on Censorship’s Mapping Media Freedom project since its launch in 2014. Here are some of the most worrying reports from February.
    🔊 We’ll tackle this topic at ‪#‎ijf16‬:

📅 “Captured news media: the case of Turkey”, with Baris Altintas, Murat Coban, Canan Coskun, Kadri Gursel and Marina Petrillo

  • As newsrooms disappear, veteran reporters are being forced from the profession. That’s bad for journalism — and democracy. An interesting report from The Nation.
  • Can explanatory journalism cure the internet? The renewed interest in explanatory journalism — and it is by no means a new phenomenon: there’s been a Pulitzer for the category since 1985 — is a rational and necessary response to the overwhelming levels of misinformation on the Internet.
  • Metered paywalls are the most common subscription model, and the average price for a digital newspaper subscription is $3.11 a week. A new report from the American Press Institute examined all U.S. newspapers with a circulation over 50,000 (98 papers); of those, 77 had a paid digital subscription plan of some sort, and 71 of those plans were launched just in the last five years.
  • Guardian wants to persuade more readers to become paying members, but editor Katharine Viner insisted there are no plans for an online paywall.
  • BBC News is braced for cuts of £80m over the next four years as the corporation as a whole looks to save £550m a year by 2021–22.
  • The New York Times points to eight principles it has adopted to transform its business.
  • People’s ability to succeed in journalism depends on how comfortable they are with fast change,” says Mark Little, Twitter’s vice president for media in Europe and Africa, during this Q&A with Journalist.co.uk.
    🔊 Mark Little will be ‪#‎ijf16‬ speaker:

📅 “Twitter turns ten: what’s next for the platform that redefined news?”, with Mark Little and Anna Masera.

  • ‘Spotlight’ won the the Best Picture Oscar, and joins ‘All the President’s Men’ in the pantheon of great journalism movies. But the six proudest people at the Dolby Theatre on Sunday night were definitely the six real-life reporters of Boston Globe. One question: where were Boston’s TV stations during the Church sex abuse scandal?

International Journalism Festival is the biggest annual media event in Europe. It’s an open invitation to interact with the best of world journalism. All sessions are free entry for all attendees, all venues are situated in the stunning setting of the historic town centre of Perugia. Come and join us!

Perugia, Italy | 6–10 april 2016 | X edition #ijf16 | Free entry

⚡ ijf weekly roundup

International Journalism Festival is the biggest annual media event in Europe. It's an open invitation to interact with the best of world journalism. All sessions are free entry for all attendees. Come and join us!

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International Journalism Festival #ijf20 | 14th edition | 1–5 April 2020 | Watch #ijf19 on-demand: media.journalismfestival.com

⚡ ijf weekly roundup

International Journalism Festival is the biggest annual media event in Europe. It's an open invitation to interact with the best of world journalism. All sessions are free entry for all attendees. Come and join us!