Mind Blowing 3-D Microscopic Brain Images

Obtained using AI to stack thousands of electron microscope images of a tiny piece taken from a woman’s brain.

Rich Sobel
ILLUMINATION-Curated

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A small screenshot “piece” taken from the gallery picture entitled Incoming Axons

One of the major challenges in understanding how our brains actually do what they do is to identify all the different types of cells and the ways in which they physically and chemically “talk” to each other.

Once you know all of the different cells, then it would be great to see if an atlas, or map, of how they all connect to each other could be constructed.

Our brain is such a large organ. How would you go about that? Where would you even start?

In the past, such a project would have been considered too large for a small team to do very much.

Daunting is the word I would have used.

But not anymore!

In the past few years lots of new tools and methods have been developed that encourage researchers to think they actually can begin to address such a large project.

Other “big data” projects have been successfully managed in other disciplines besides biology. Large language models, LLMs, using artificial intelligence engines, AI, are starting to be used for organizing and searching through these kinds of large data sets.

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Rich Sobel
ILLUMINATION-Curated

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