Using Your Midlife Crisis to Engineer a Better Life

They function to give us direction and purpose.

Sean Kernan
ILLUMINATION-Curated

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Pexels Images via Pavel Danilyuk

It was only around age 35, when age 40 was a short leap away, that I began to truly think differently. Up until then, it wasn’t like I didn’t know I’d eventually die, and that life was finite.

There’s a certain bravado that comes with youth, a willingness to live free and disregard consequences in varying doses. The world feels vast and with unending possibilities. I changed my college major a couple of times, frequented bars and stayed until closing, traveled the world, flirted with girls, got my heart broken, and lived at full tilt.

Your thinking really does change as you get older, and it's necessary. It isn’t cute being the 40 year old at the bar at 2 AM on a Thursday night. Perhaps more of us should experience a midlife crisis.

The origins of the term

Dr. Elliot Jaques, a psychoanalyst and physician, coined the phrase midlife crisis in 1959 during a speech, saying it was a period where we must face our limitations and mortality. He described one of his patients saying, “Up till now, life has seemed an endless upward slope, with nothing but the distant horizon in view. Now suddenly I seem to have reached the crest of the hill, and there stretching ahead is…

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Sean Kernan
ILLUMINATION-Curated

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