Who Cares If America Is A Racist Country?

Some questions are more valuable than others

Steve QJ
ILLUMINATION-Curated

--

Photo by RF._.studio from Pexels

It used to be easy to define racism. It was the notion that one race was superior to another. It was hatred and fear and bigotry. It was the belief that the colour of a person’s skin was more important than the content of their character.

Times have changed.

In part, this is because change was necessary. Thinking of racism only as individual prejudice made it harder to address gaps in education outcomes and employment rates for example. It obscured the impact of wealth inequality and a lack of social mobility. It made issues like workplace diversity and unconscious bias difficult to understand.

Recognising that racism goes beyond racial slurs and minstrel shows allowed us to think about it more precisely and talk about it more intelligently.

Well, it helped most of us.

Some people took their newfound grasp of racial nuance and ran with it. “Are trees racist?” they asked in fraught school board meetings. “Are earrings racist?” they mused in online editorials. “Is cheese racist?” they asked when they learned that black people are more likely to be lactose-intolerant.

Eventually, inevitably, they realised they could go even further:

--

--

Steve QJ
ILLUMINATION-Curated

Race. Politics. Culture. Sometimes other things. Almost always polite. Find more at https://steveqj.substack.com