5 Steps to Rewire Your Foundation With Money

Our relationship with money starts when we are young. Unless we have a healthy approach to money, we may repeat what we’ve inherited.

Jennifer Thompson
ILLUMINATION
Published in
3 min readSep 6, 2022

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Photo by Alexander Dummer on Unsplash

Your foundation in your understanding of life, including money, starts when you’re a child. But unfortunately, many of us did not come from families with a solid financial foundation.

Whether your family was wealthy or your parents lived paycheck to paycheck, unless they demonstrated a healthy relationship with money, chances are you’ve adopted some poor habits and disempowering beliefs that may no longer serve you.

You must rewire your foundation with money if you want to release any disempowering ideas and habits you may have learned about money.

Here are five ways to do that:

1. Question your subconscious beliefs

Most of us adopt financial habits we saw demonstrated or taught by our parents. However, these may or may not help us achieve our financial goals or a healthy relationship with money.

Inherent in these habits and lessons from our parents are deeply entrenched beliefs. Many of us fail to question these beliefs. The idea that you were born poor and may never be rich. Or views money as inherently ‘bad’ and those “wealthy people are entitled.”

If you genuinely believe that money is terrible and wealthy people are entitled, you may unconsciously work against being financially independent because no one wants to look ‘bad’ or entitled.

2. Reframe your beliefs

If you know the life you want and money can help you achieve it, why not adopt empowering beliefs about money?

Beliefs such as; “I can use my money to help others.” And that “money gives me options to live my best life?

3. Put credit in its proper place

Carrying debt — often termed “bad debt” — on depreciating assets robs you of your financial future. Not all debt is “bad.” Debt that helps you purchase assets — such as a mortgage on a home — is often called “good debt.”

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