A Hanukkah Miracle — Vaccine Style

Do you know the story of Hanukkah? Did a new version of the Hanukkah miracle just occur?

Janice Maves
Dec 17, 2020 · 3 min read
Photo by Element5 Digital on Unsplash

Every year our family celebrates Hanukkah, the festival of lights. This holiday is based on the story of a miracle in ancient times. The story goes something like this:

The Jews of Judea were ruled by an evil Roman king, Antiochus, who tried to force them to worship the god(s) of his choice. But Jews are stubborn, especially about who they are going to worship, and fought back against this religious persecution.

A band of rebel Jews (yes, even in ancient Judea there were rebels), Judah and his gang of Maccabees, rose up against these evil, idol worshiping goyem and chased them out of Judea.

The Romans, however, had left a terrible mess behind them. They had even trashed the holy temple and its most holy of holy, the ark. The Jews were pretty angry about this but they set to cleaning things up including re-lighting the eternal flame that was lit at the entrance to the ark.

To this day, a Ner Tamid, or eternal light, burns perpetually in Jewish synagogues before or near the ark of the Law, the cabinet holding the Torah scrolls. In ancient times there was no generator backup, olive oil was the fuel of choice, and the Jews at the temple had only enough oil to get that lamp burning for a single day.

This was a major problem. The eternal light was a necessity. Eternal lights are not supposed to go out. I don’t know if that was because there weren’t enough windows letting in light, or if the ancient readers needed glasses to read the ancient scrolls, but that light needed to be lit. TRADITION is a big deal in Judaism. Even then, when traditions were becoming traditional.

The oil crisis of the ancient Jews was a production issue. Olive oil for the lamp would take eight days to produce. There was only enough oil for one day. The math was not looking good. Yet, there was a miracle and the oil which was only supposed to last one day lasted for eight days and nights, until the oil needed for the Ner Tamid was ready.

Wow. We have a major holiday that celebrates the production of olive oil. Of course it’s a festival of lights at the darkest time of the year. Hmmmmm, kind of coincides with what Druids, then Christians and other agrarian cultures were doing to brighten the winter solstice. But that’s another story.

This is the story of a miracle. A miracle of abundance. This is the story of a commodity that was only predicted to supply one day of use being useful for eight days.

What does that have to do with vaccines? We now know that six and even seven doses of vaccine can be “squeezed” from a single vial of that frozen miracle serum produced by Pfizer. Each vial was only supposed to supply five doses. This increase per vial represents millions of extra doses of vaccine. More eternal light at the end of this pandemic tunnel.

A modern miracle brought to you by Big Pharma. Happy Hanukkah.

Janice Maves

Written by

Essayist, Poet, Mom, Dog Owner. Lives in Cornish, ME with Wallace the Airedale, and ponders Life In General.

ILLUMINATION

We curate and disseminate outstanding articles from diverse domains and disciplines to create fusion and synergy.

Janice Maves

Written by

Essayist, Poet, Mom, Dog Owner. Lives in Cornish, ME with Wallace the Airedale, and ponders Life In General.

ILLUMINATION

We curate and disseminate outstanding articles from diverse domains and disciplines to create fusion and synergy.

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