ILLUMINATION
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ILLUMINATION

Democracy or Dictatorship: Which is better?

It’s almost blasphemous to question the great democracy, isn’t it?

They all smelt it: Captain Petrov was smoking a joint again. (Pixabay)

In late 2021, The Australian government pulled out of a submarine deal with France, instead choosing to purchase ‘nuclear submarines’ from the U.S. in a deal worth $90 billion.

Here’s how the conversation would have almost definitely gone.

The latest in a long line of legendary British leaders (Source: ptv)

Later, once the dastardly deal was done, a big question would have arisen:

How are we going to sell this to the people?

Cue: Australian people shit themselves at the possibility of a war with China

(Source: redseasprep)

One benefit of a dictatorship is that shit just gets done.

  • He doesn’t need to create a new Facebook group with a clever name.
  • He doesn’t need to put on some amateur dramatics act about another country being a threat.
  • He doesn’t need to justify the move to his political sponsors or his voters.
  • He doesn’t need to run it past parliament.
Putin just buys the subs (Tenor)

Has anyone noticed that countries like Russia don’t go around constantly flinging excrement at other countries? To understand why you have to consider that:

People complain about how corruption happens in a dictatorship, and they claim this is because one person has absolute power. But this just isn’t true.

  • In our democracy, it is legal for a company to contribute financially to a politician’s campaign in exchange for political favours. It’s called lobbying. That’s right, corruption is not only legal but encouraged.
  • In our democracy, it is perfectly legal for a tobacco company to increase the addictiveness of cigarettes. In Australia, 70% of the price of a packet of cigarettes goes to the government. They use it to prop up the budget and announce a ‘surplus’ for political reasons. Then, they make nicotine vaping illegal because it is a gateway drug to tobacco (which is legal).
  • In the U.S., it is legal for politicians who make decisions on military action to buy shares in defence companies and, therefore, make vast amounts of money by voting to send their country to war.
  • In the U.S. it is legal for private prison administrators to lobby the government for harsher criminal penalties to increase their’ staff’.
  • It is legal for those prison companies to pay ‘prisoners’ less than a dollar an hour to produce government items such as military equipment and items for other private corporations such as Mcdonalds, Wendy’s, Starbucks, Walmart…
Anyone for McSlavery? (C. Cagnin)

In a democracy, if you want to get something good done, there is always a price to pay.

  • If I want to get my human rights bill through, I must wine and dine several other people. To get them to agree to vote for my bill, In turn, I have to agree to vote for their pro-fracking bill or whatever.
  • Politicians get drunk on the job (alcohol is provided 24/7 even during critical decision making) and vote according to the deals they have made rather than according to their beliefs.
  • These people are paid six-figure salaries, which they then receive for life following four years of service. They have the cheek to call the welfare system parasitical.

Our political system is sick. It is custom-designed for greedy people to make personal profits.

Dictatorship is not new. Throughout history, there has been a lot more single-person leadership than democracies.

Some might suggest that the problem with Dictatorships is that they can only rise to power through some kind of violence.

How do you think democracies come into power?

Democracies and dictatorships are exactly the same in how they come to power — through violence.

  • The difference between how they operate is that one just operates, and the other has to justify every move politically.
  • The level of corruption is not dependant on the system but on the people that are voted into that system.

In summary, the difference between a democracy and a dictatorship is that several arseholes decide the rules instead of one.

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Frank T Bird

Frank T Bird

Australian author of urban stream-of-consciousness fiction and psychedelic short stories. franktbird.com