Girl Power Talk Empowers Youth

An India-based company is redefining workplace opportunities for teens in developing countries.

Suzanne Paschall
ILLUMINATION
Published in
11 min readJun 1, 2022

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Rachita Sharma addresses the team at Girl Power Talk’s open mic and conference in 2022. Image courtesy Girl Power Talk.

Who says teenagers can’t work on complex business projects for international clients? Not Girl Power Talk, a social enterprise based in India whose belief is that young people can, with the right support, contribute far more in business and cultural spheres than they are often given the chance to in most organizations. They believe this is especially true for women in emerging markets.

Girl Power Talk co-founder Rachita Sharma is the perfect example. Today, at age 26, she manages the day-to-day activities of the organization, made up of some 75+ youth leaders from all over the world. She also serves as Chief Marketing Officer for Blue Ocean Global Technology, the corporate partner started in 2012 by Sameer Somal, the other co-founder of Girl Power Talk.

“At 20 I started working with Blue Ocean,” she said. “I was the front face talking with clients and handling the large projects, without them guessing how old I was. They didn’t even know what part of the world I belonged to.”

It was important to be taken seriously for the young Indian woman who has been an active feminist since her early teens in a country that has still not embraced many feminist ideals.

Rachita Sharma, CEO & Co-founder, Girl Power Talk. Image courtesy Girl Power Talk.

“I needed to hustle and be the best version of myself I wanted to be,” she says. “I knew I could do the negotiations, do the deals, engage and retain the clients, and do the projects.”

Identity politics

Rachita’s story of how far she was willing to go to be seen for her own merits, rather than to benefit from the centuries-old caste system, is remarkable. In Grade 8, a sheet was given to her to fill in for very important board exams. “The exams give you a primary document you need all your life as proof of identity,” Rachita says. “It’s the first legal document from the government you get in your name in India. In that moment, I was handed my sheet in class and I decided I would not put my last name down.” The name on this document was…

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Suzanne Paschall
ILLUMINATION

I am a screenwriter, non-fiction book author, blogger, songwriter and editor. I am currently completing my first short film, and have a slate of other projects.