How Meditation Decreases The Intensity of Worrisome Thoughts

The Science Behind Meditation and Anxiety

Joe Gibson, Above The Middle
ILLUMINATION

--

Photograph by cottonbro studio on Pexels

I used to be an avid meditator.

Every day for 10 minute in the morning I would commit to my mindfulness practice. Sitting cross legged on my bed, eyes closed, and my focus zeroed in to the darkness behind my eyes, I’d “note” each thought that entered my mind, and non-judgementally let them enter and leave.

Further, I’d use my breath as an anchor, a constant source of “presentness” I could return to when my mind would pull me away, often to worrying thoughts about the future followed soon by a tinge of anxiety.

A mindfulness meditation practice, with time I found it easier to distance myself from my worried thoughts, which in turn led to less frequent experiences of anxiety and low mood. Often times, it is our thoughts that contribute towards these experiences: something triggers us, we have worrisome/sad thoughts about the subject and before we know it we’re feeling anxious and spiralling.

Worrisome thoughts are often invasive too, popping into our mind at random throughout the day. Most of us don’t choose to initially think the way we do, it is our brain that is conditioned to respond to a circumstance based on our past experiences. For example, someone might give you a…

--

--

Joe Gibson, Above The Middle
ILLUMINATION

Your path to authentic love and secure relationships starts here. Above The Middle, a blog by me, Joe Gibson.