Knowing What an Audience Wants Is Tricky, Even for AI

Your gut instinct is needed more than ever

George “Ace” Acevedo
ILLUMINATION

--

Photo by Author

One piece of advice I always give in a webinar is to publish often.

I’ve found it’s the best way to improve your work. No story will ever be perfect, so obsessing over one article for days is non-productive. Get something out there, accept feedback, learn from it, and move on to the next piece.

I usually get some pushback on this. I had an attendee insist that they should only post their very best work to increase the response to it. He said every article should be special. But here’s why that doesn’t make sense: No one knows what people will respond to in advance. I’ve had stories I thought would do well but didn’t and stories I thought would languish but didn’t.

I’m far from alone in this. There are famous stories of creative people second-guessing themselves on work that became popular.

For example, Queen frontman Freddie Mercury didn’t think “Bohemian Rhapsody” was worthy of being on the album A Night at the Opera. And Kurt Cobain didn’t want “Smells Like Teen Spirit” on Nirvana’s last album. Even producer Quincy Jones was wrong about “Billie Jean” by Michael Jackson. He thought the song needed to be cut from the Thriller LP because…

--

--

George “Ace” Acevedo
ILLUMINATION

Writer. Noisemaker. Visual Artist. Former radio guy who knows a little about a lot.