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Aphasia Types

Talking Ain’t Easy After a Stroke — Dealing with Aphasia

Aphasia is a speaking disorder that can make it hard to understand and use words.

Photo by Kate Kalvach on Unsplash

It can be frustrating for both the person with aphasia and the persons to communicate with them. Understanding how to better communicate with someone who has aphasia.

Speaking Disorders — What is Aphasia?

Aphasia — “a failure to grasp or put together language because of damage to specific brain regions.” This does not mean that individuals with aphasia cannot speak. There are other types of aphasia. This can affect an individual’s ability to speak, understand, read, or write. Aphasia can caused by stroke, brain injury, or other neurological conditions.

Types of Aphasia

There are four main types of aphasia:

- Broca’s aphasia: difficulty speaking

- Wernicke’s aphasia: difficulty understanding speech

- Global aphasia: severe language impairment that affects both speaking and understanding

- Anomic aphasia: difficulty finding words

Broca’s Aphasia

Speaking difficulty caused by damage to Broca’s area in the frontal lobe of the brain. May be able to understand speech but have trouble speaking. Often produce short, simple sentences.

Wernicke’s Aphasia

Understanding speech cause by damage to Wernicke’s area in the temporal lobe of the brain. May be able to speak but have trouble understanding what they’re saying. Often produce long, rambling sentences that don’t make sense.

Global Aphasia

Severe language impairment that affects speaking and understanding. Caused by damage to many areas of the brain.

Anomic Aphasia

Difficulty finding words. Can originate damage to any area of the brain but is often seen in people with frontal lobe damage.

These are few of the types of aphasia that exist. Every type is rare and can present different changes when it comes to communication. If you know someone with aphasia, remember to be patient and use simple, clear language. Gestures, pictures, and written notes can also be helpful in supplementing communication. With time and understanding, it is possible to overcome the challenges of communication.

Aphasia is depressing for both the people. There are ways to better understand and communicate with someone who has aphasia. To be patient, use simple language, communication with signal, pictures, or written notes. With time and understanding, it is possible to overcome the challenges of communication.

Did you know that approximately two million Americans have aphasia? Aphasia can be stem by stroke, brain injury, or other neurological conditions.

Broca’s Aphasia, Wernicke’s Aphasia, Global Aphasia, and Anomic Aphasia. If you know someone with aphasia, remember to be patient and use simple, clear language. Gestures, pictures, and written notes can also be helpful in supplementing communication. With time and understanding, it is possible to overcome the challenges of communication.

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Willie Bradley

Live a Model Life After a Stroke! Life after a stroke is hard but everyday is worth it! Cum N' Eat It Social!