The Blackbird Seat.

How Trump and blackbirds are feathering their nests.

Robert Cormack
ILLUMINATION
5 min readJun 12, 2024

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Image by Andreas Volz from Pixabay

“Take these sunken eyes and learn to see…” Paul McCartney

Anyone watching Donald Trump’s hush money trial, might see a striking resemblance with a bird that could be his reincarnated soulmate.

I’m speaking, of course, of the blackbird. Like the man now taking a second run at the presidency with 34 felony convictions, the blackbird sees no problem facing what seem like insurmountable odds.

In political terms it’s called “the big bluff.”

Perched on a cattail, like Trump standing outside the courthouse calling the trial “rigged,” the blackbird lets out his “conk-la-ree,” telling bird, man — or even horse — he’s ready to defend his territory.

In political terms it’s called “the big bluff.”

Blackbirds do tend to have an inflated idea of their size and importance. To see them attack much larger creatures — including us — we’re amazed by the feistiness, even if it is like hurling stones at a giant expecting a “David and Goliath” moment. In the real world, we’re more likely to get stomped.

Same goes for Trump. Despite his conviction — and a gag order — Trump continues to rail against the court, the judge and the jurors. He seems to think it shows his own feistiness, calling the court and everyone “corrupt.”

It hardly seems to matter that he still has 54 charges ahead of him. Interestingly, none of these will be dealt with before the November election.

What he does have to deal with is his sentencing hearing on July 11th. Nobody expects him to face prison time, but even if he wins the presidency in November, he can’t pardon himself because the charges are state not federal.

So it really does come down to feistiness at this point, something the blackbird understands better than most. Like Trump, the blackbird realizes it’s in a vulnerable position.

Trump’s never built anything close to the ground, but he’s still keenly aware of his adversaries, too.

Having its nest so close to the ground, makes it an easy target for its adversaries. Trump’s never built anything close to the ground, but he’s still keenly aware of his adversaries, too.

He’s particularly fond of smacking down members of his own party who fail to support him — even if he’s clearly wrong.

When prominent Republican, and former Maryland governor, Larry Hogan, urged Americans to “respect the verdict” of Trump’s court case, Hogan was told, “You just ended your campaign.” That’s what happens when you peck at Trump.

Blackbirds have a similar attitude, expecting loyalty despite not being the slightest bit monogamous themselves. The males, in fact, can breed with at least five females, but as many as fifteen.

I’m sure they expect loyalty from each one.

Trump’s not the least bit monogamous, either. If he had been, there wouldn’t have been the hush-money trial. Afterall, it was nothing more than hiding payments to porn star Stormy Daniels.

Blackbirds are actually excellent problem-solvers, using any means necessary to get what they want.

I know I’m stretching logic here, considering Trump’s a man and blackbirds are, well, birds. But it’s interesting to note how sneaky both can be. Blackbirds are actually excellent problem-solvers, using any means necessary to get what they want.

Scientists have even witnessed blackbirds using tools to open something they wouldn’t be able to open otherwise.

Trump loves tools, too, especially expensive ones — or sneaky ones. In his luxuriated world, it helps if they’re both.

Just recently, he promised oil executives he’d make favourable policy changes if they’d raise $1 billion to return him to the White House. It’s now the subject of two subcommittee investigations.

Here’s the problem with that: campaign finance laws limit contributions made to federal candidates. They can only receive a maximum of $6,000 per donor in each election cycle.

As Trump discovered, SuperPACs are the best birdfeeders going. He’s been feeding at them for years.

However, lower courts decided contributions of any size could go to action committees not directly linked to a candidate. This gave us SuperPACs, or what any blackbird would call a big birdfeeder. As Trump discovered, SuperPACs are the best birdfeeders going. He’s been feeding at them for years.

To take this “birdfeeders” analogy even further, Trump’s notorious for making quid pro quo deals. Whether it’s oil executives or leaders of countries, Trump always places “the deal” ahead of anything else. You could say, like the blackbird, he’s found a tool to open what he couldn’t open otherwise.

Take the case of him telling Volodymyr Zelensky that relations between the U.S. and Ukraine would improve if they got rid of corruption (providing dirt on the Bidens was a way to start).

Corruption is a dirty word in any democracy, something Trump figured Zelensky would want to avoid. Unfortunately, there was a whistleblower, and Trump ended up appearing more corrupt than the corruption he was complaining about.

Even with his latest convictions, he still managed to raise $34.8 million from his base in just 24 hours (that’s 2 million an hour).

But, like all things Trump, somehow he keeps bouncing back. Even with his latest convictions, he still managed to raise $34.8 million from his base in just 24 hours (that’s 2 million an hour).

Trump, meanwhile just keeps saying “I did nothing wrong,” while offering his followers black caps at $45 dollars apiece.

Perhaps that’s another similarity Trump shares with the feisty blackbird. They both have an amazing ability to feather their nests. The blackbird uses sticks and mud. Trump uses SuperPACs and the contributions of party faithful.

They’re birds of a feather, in other words. Feisty and certainly sure of themselves. We’ll know this November just how feisty Trump can be. His numbers remain high, so it’s anybody’s guess how this election will wrap up.

If Trump is half as successful, we could have the first felon in the White House.

And the blackbird? Well, based on what I’ve seen out my front window, the young are born, and the predators are kept at bay. If Trump is successful this November, we could have the first felon in the White House. And if courts are “rigged” and elections are “corrupt” what’s left of democracy — or democrazy?

Sneaky birds are one thing.

A sneaky president is another.

Let’s see what the next election brings.

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Robert Cormack
ILLUMINATION

I did a poor imitation of Don Draper for 40 years before writing my first novel. I'm currently in the final stages of a children's book. Lucky me.