In the Bleak Midwinter

Seth Thomas
Dec 22, 2016 · 2 min read

Welcome to winter, my friends. Although, it feels like winter has set in long ago and we are already longing for the light of spring to dawn, aren’t we?

As we celebrated the Winter Solstice last evening I am struck by the hauntingly beautiful carol, “In the Bleak Midwinter.”

In the bleak mid-winter
Frosty wind made moan,
Earth stood hard as iron,
Water like a stone;
Snow had fallen, snow on snow,
Snow on snow,
In the bleak mid-winter
Long ago.

Our God, Heaven cannot hold Him
Nor earth sustain;
Heaven and earth shall flee away
When He comes to reign:
In the bleak mid-winter
A stable-place sufficed
The Lord God Almighty,
Jesus Christ.

It is so fitting that we celebrate the birth of Christ in connection with the darkest of days. There is such great joy and promise in the birth of a child. They bring light to the darkness, warmth to the cold stone of the icy world.

We face not only the bleakness of the cold, dark days of winter. We face the bleak impossibilities of a world ravaged by political, religious, racial, and identity divisions. We face a world that certainly cannot sustain the beauty and light and glory of the one who comes, the light of Christ.

But this is the hope: God chooses this very ground to make all heaven and earth new. This cold stone we walk upon is the ground God makes holy and makes new, using us as the vehicles for this transformation. In the bleak midwinter, the Christ-child is born — the one who will bring about a new way of being, new life for all who follow him, new hope out of the darkness.

Let us stand in these darkest of days and celebrate the reign of the light who bursts forth in the bleak darkness.

Peace,

Seth

impossible light

reflections for the season of advent on impossibility…

impossible light

reflections for the season of advent on impossibility, hope, light, and darkness

Seth Thomas

Written by

Finding rhythm in Bellingham, WA.

impossible light

reflections for the season of advent on impossibility, hope, light, and darkness