3 Nutrition Myths You Need To Know About

“I don’t see why someone should lose their life just so you can have a snack.” -Russell Brand

Parsh Jain
Nov 28, 2020 · 5 min read
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Photo by Dan Gold on Unsplash

To begin with I’m not a licensed nutritionist but I have been working on my diet and my body for roughly the past 1.5 years. I have had a simple approach towards dieting and exercise which is: I am willing to experiment with my approaches towards trying to reach my body and mind’s potential.

Over the course of a small but informational journey, I have learned some of the myths that people develop and follow the food and nutrition.

These are some of the things that I have heard people talk about and argue about, but I took the matter into my hands instead of arguing I went for research and scientifically backed facts.

Vegans cannot build muscle

I can’t even remember how many trainers and friends have told me to start eating eggs and chicken for my protein intake, being a vegetarian all my life I never paid any heed to it but one thing that I have observed is that us vegetarians need to make some alterations in our eating habits. We need to include a good amount of soya and lentils to cover up for the lost protein. I’m personally not a fan of protein shakes but I still take them every day because I know that with the consistency and load of my exercise, I need a supplement to help me recover my muscles.

One astonishing example of who I look up to in the vegan bodybuilding space is “The Vegan Dread,” Torre Washington, who has been a vegan for nearly two decades. When asked in an interview if there’s a disadvantage between vegans and meat-eaters, Washington said there’s no difference since muscle is built based upon your training regimen. “If anything, I am at an advantage being vegan, since plants expedite the recovery and recuperation,” he said.

The evidence of every variety overwhelmingly highlights the benefits of plant-predominant diets for the health outcomes that matter most: years in life, and life in years; longevity, and vitality. If you are hesitant about completely shifting to plant-based vegan diet, you can try it as an experiment for a month and see how you feel and perform in your training routine.

Weight loss is easy

If you’ve been fooled by the before and after photos of people and their mind-boggling body transformations, you’re not alone. People tend to pay attention to anything that is even remotely visually appealing and watching people look like a completely new guy/gal is something that releases a lot of dopamine in your body so you think you’ll also be able to do it easily. That cannot be farther from the truth, if the person in the photo is a natural then any kind of fat to fit transformation takes at least six months. The way fat loss works is that it first goes from your face, arms, legs, and then lastly your stomach. So, the 30-day abs building programs are just messing with you and are only selling bullsh*t.

Much like succeeding in anything, chiseling and sculpting your body takes hard work. There is a reason it is called stubborn fat. Do not get de-motivated by your lack of progress in the first couple of months, associate your exercise with how good you feel after you’ve completed your workout.

Weight loss is a long and tedious process, but the journey is surely worth it. If you’re struggling to lose weight, you’re not alone. The best thing to do is drown out the weight loss noise that you’re exposed to every day and find a nourishing and sustainable dietary and activity pattern that works for you.

Carbs make you gain weight

For decades, fat was the enemy; today, there is a new scapegoat: carbs. Vilifying carbs and insulin seems to get more popular by the year. In reality, what I have observed is, eating a moderate amount of nutritious carbs that are high in fiber, vitamins, and minerals like starchy root vegetables, ancient grains, and legumes will likely benefit your health — not harm it.

However, it’s true that going on a low-carb diet can help you shed pounds faster than usual — and for some people (like diabetics) there may be a time and place for cutting back on them. For the human body in general, though, carbs serve as a vital energy source not to be missed. Lauren Artise, RD of The Nutrition Professionals, weighs in: “One of the biggest myths about nutrition today is that carbohydrates are the enemy and, therefore, should be avoided.” Artise likens eating carbs to fueling up your car since they break down into glucose, the body’s preferred source of fuel.

Just like you wouldn’t let your gas tank get empty, you shouldn’t let your carb stores get too low. All carbs are not created equal, however. Artise recommends choosing complex carbohydrates found in whole grains, fruits, vegetables, and legumes, rather than simple carbs in refined grains and sugary beverages.

On that note, carb-rich foods like cakes, cookies, sweetened beverages, and white bread should be restricted, as these foods can increase weight gain and disease risk when eaten in excess. So, in conclusion, food quality is the main predictor of disease risk and ailments.

The Bottom Line

The nutrition world is rife with misinformation, leading to public confusion, mistrust of health professionals, and poor dietary choices.

This, coupled with the fact that nutrition science is constantly changing, makes it no wonder that most people have a warped view of what constitutes a healthy diet.

What I can do, is suggest you experiment and track how you feel when you make changes in your diet. Stick to a particular routine of eating and tracking for at least 45 days to make conclusive observations as that is ample time to make any major dietary changes.

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Criticism is appreciated.

Cheers.

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Parsh Jain

Written by

I read and overthink. New Delhi | Melbourne

In Fitness And In Health

A fast-growing health and fitness community dedicated to sharing knowledge, lessons, and suggestions to living happier, healthier lives.

Parsh Jain

Written by

I read and overthink. New Delhi | Melbourne

In Fitness And In Health

A fast-growing health and fitness community dedicated to sharing knowledge, lessons, and suggestions to living happier, healthier lives.

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