Stop Blaming Fitness Influencers for Your Body Image Issues

Examine why fit bodies trigger you.

Nicole Linke
In Fitness And In Health

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fit women standing in front of a sunset
Photo by Jon Ly on Unsplash

Hating on the fitness industry, especially so-called “fitness influencers,” seems to be “in” these days.

Prominent fitness professionals themselves hate on the industry; researchers have concluded “[…] that viewing fitspiration models on Instagram was more likely to lower self-perceived sexual attractiveness among women […],” and the New York Times published an article titled “Most Fitness Influencers Are Doing More Harm Than Good.”

However, the consumer’s self-responsibility aspect is sadly overlooked in the discussion. It’s easy to point fingers and blame others for making us feel or behave a certain way.

But what we really should be looking at more are our own insecurities and body-image issues. We must ask ourselves why we find fitness influencers triggering, why we consume fitness content in the first place, and how we can learn to distinguish between helpful and unhelpful content.

And if we get inspired by consuming fitness content or triggered by it depends on our attitude, self-image, and willingness to learn as much as it depends on what creators put on display.

What Does Being A Fitness Influencer Even Mean?

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Nicole Linke
In Fitness And In Health

I talk about developing strength in body and mind. | Ultrarunner | Ultrarunning Coach | Newsletter: https://nicolelinke.com/newsletter-sign-up/