Why I Refused to Upgrade My Phone

You can say I’m a few years behind.

Natalya Jones
Oct 29, 2020 · 4 min read
Image courtesy of Pixabay

I am notorious for never upgrading my phone.

Throughout all four years of college, I had a flip phone that cost $20 at most. Towards the end of senior year, I finally upgraded to a Sidekick-esque Android, and was astonished I could take pictures on it. I couldn’t send or see any pictures I received, because, you know, I had a college budget to buy a phone.

Regardless, it was a big step. After a family member stated that my phone was embarrassing (let’s be honest, it was), I upgraded to my first iPhone. Albeit, the oldest version there was, but it was still something.

Old habits die hard: I had a 5c for about 3 years and insisted on keeping it until became a basic brick. The turning point for me wasn’t heckling from friends, but a Chance the Rapper concert when a video didn’t record, potentially due to outdated software (my 5c couldn’t handle new updates — go figure). I then decided it was time for a device slightly more modernized.

I now have a 7 and plenty of reasons why I take so long to upgrade my cell. Here’s why.

1. I already knew my phone.

Let’s start with the obvious: I was already accustomed to my 5c. Which makes since, since I had it for over three years and all. The slow reception, the simplicity, the minimal storage — it was nothing new to me. Having to exit out of a website because it wasn’t loading or deleting excess pictures was almost a daily routine (more on the latter later). Why invite a change in technology, with it comes with confusing new software and gadgets?

If it ain’t broke, don’t fix it. Am I right?

2. I wanted less clutter.

You already read that I deleted tons of pictures to free up storage on my phone. Believe it or not, despite the minute anxiety that came with it, it was strangely cathartic. I hate excess “stuff” with a fiery passion. I constantly give away clothes, shoes and miscellaneous items without replacing them because I can’t stand clutter.

It’s no different for my phone — at least once a month, I clean out (read: “delete”) all my texts, videos, photos, notes, completed reminders and apps that aren’t necessary. The same method holds true for my emails and social media accounts, but with direct messages.

To further my point, more storage as a feature for a new phone was not as enticing as one would deem. I was almost panicked, thinking of potential excess lying in my device. As an owner of an older phone model, it’s essential to continuously clean out your device to create more storage.

Call it borderline neurosis, and blame the Marie Kondo book as part of the cause. But damn, it feels so zen to be a minimalist.

3. I wanted to disconnect.

I wouldn’t say that I’m a serial phone user, but I am on my phone often enough to note that yes, I can definitely spend less time on it. With an older model, it became easier to reach my goal: phone use became frustrating as everything would take forever to load. Putting down my device, I would shortly forget what I was looking up (sometimes).

It was as if my 5c was telling me, “We talked about this, remember? Here, I’ll shut down the page of Safari for you or freeze on this app.” This situation became particularly stressful for times I used Maps as primary navigation in a new area but I was reaching my goal and that’s all that mattered, right?

Alas, as you know, I caved. Aside from the concert video becoming a corrupt file, it was the freezing that came with Google maps and my emails that convinced me it was time. It’s okay, though, because in another four years I’ll just upgrade again. After countless glitches, of course.

You just read another post from In Fitness And In Health: a health and fitness community dedicated to sharing knowledge, lessons, and suggestions to living happier, healthier lives.

If you’d like to join our newsletter and receive more stories like this one, tap here.

In Fitness And In Health

Inspiring stories related to health, fitness and the pursuit of well-being.

Natalya Jones

Written by

Fond of puns and an alliteration addict, Natalya loves to run, read, and write. To see her work, visit JonesingForJournals.com.

In Fitness And In Health

A fast-growing health and fitness community dedicated to sharing knowledge, lessons, and suggestions to living happier, healthier lives.

Natalya Jones

Written by

Fond of puns and an alliteration addict, Natalya loves to run, read, and write. To see her work, visit JonesingForJournals.com.

In Fitness And In Health

A fast-growing health and fitness community dedicated to sharing knowledge, lessons, and suggestions to living happier, healthier lives.

Medium is an open platform where 170 million readers come to find insightful and dynamic thinking. Here, expert and undiscovered voices alike dive into the heart of any topic and bring new ideas to the surface. Learn more

Follow the writers, publications, and topics that matter to you, and you’ll see them on your homepage and in your inbox. Explore

If you have a story to tell, knowledge to share, or a perspective to offer — welcome home. It’s easy and free to post your thinking on any topic. Write on Medium

Get the Medium app

A button that says 'Download on the App Store', and if clicked it will lead you to the iOS App store
A button that says 'Get it on, Google Play', and if clicked it will lead you to the Google Play store