How Playing the Victim Can be a Form of Abuse (Part 2 of 2)

A. Joshua W.
In Medio Stat Veritas

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I made the decision to be honest about my feelings and to bring up the idea of pursuing a romantic relationship with my patient, but I left the decision on how to proceed in her hands. I made it clear that, if she never brought it up again, neither would I. Regardless of what she chose, I promised I would always do my best to provide her with the best possible care that I could, and if she was not interested, that would not change anything about how I treated her.

Looking back, I cannot help but feel I was doomed from moment she feigned reciprocal interest & encouraged my affections. Dismissing her could be seen as patient abandonment; continuing to treat her could be considered a violation of professional boundaries. Attraction is not something we can control; we can only control whether or not we act upon it, and in my case, I attempted to navigate the situation as best I could, with mutual communication & consent. I ceased treating her when the problems in my personal life caused by my soon-to-be-ex-wife began to interfere with my ability to care for her, and did everything I could to ensure she found the next best alternative. Yet, from almost the very beginning, she had been preparing to betray me, recording our conversations without my knowledge, setting me up with questions that would seem to incriminate me, and carefully presenting…

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A. Joshua W.
In Medio Stat Veritas

Full-time single father of 3 sons, INFJ, HSP/empath, narc abuse survivor, former rising star in chiropractic until lies & biases destroyed my career.