Why Should Anyone Care About Your Devblog?

Photo by Startup Stock Photos from Pexels

I know it is exciting to share a project. Projects are a priceless baby that has required neutering for days, months, even years: but that does not mean that your idea is more important than the several others that have been presented during the hour. Ideas are so abundant that anyone who claims to have the next big game will be quickly overrun by someone else’s thoughts. I guess that is why most people promptly run to create a dev blog the moment they have one tiny asset on the screen. If the idea in question is not strong enough to be more memorable than the competitors, then your niche creation might not be a marketable idea. Quickly realizing this is important to succeed in the gaming industry.

Usually, the time and effort people are allocating to their development blog overlap the time they should be putting into their idea, because of this, a majority of blogs I come across suffer from a lack of meaningful progress. It seems that every time creators start adding a minute feature to their project, it deserves to have a separate article written regarding it. A development blog should be used to show the end-user the progress towards creating your original idea and maintaining accountability to creating that experience. If your blog is lucky enough to attract loyal readers, then make it worth their time to keep coming, because eventually, if they notice the lack of progress, they may stop actively seeking out your product.

Do not get me wrong, development blogs are not inherently bad, but the current usage in the industry for them is poorly constructed. Each morning my Reddit feed is filled to the brim with brand new development blogs that will fail to establish a footing. They fail to create a meaningful experience for the readers, including myself — which in case you have forgotten, is the entire purpose of creating entertainment in the first place. The failure of a “dev blog” may stem from a plethora of issues, but more regularly than not, it seems to be the idea you are construing is not good enough to hold the attention of others. It is hard to hear, but it is the harsh reality.

I recommend finding the balance between sharing meaningful content you have developed and fleshing out the original idea to the maximum extent. Contrary to what this article has established, I want the idea you have created to be successful, but I encourage you to stop wasting our time on your mediocrities. The number of projects I see abandoned at “dev blog 3” is too high, so by reducing the time you spend writing about your game, you can increase the time you spend making your game. With enough tweaking, any idea can be market viable, but finding your footing is a hard feat. Write about the importance of your additions, and save the mediocrities for later.

I recommend finding the balance between sharing meaningful content you have developed and fleshing out the original idea to the maximum extent. Contrary to what this article has established, I want the idea you have created to be successful, but I encourage you to stop wasting our time on your mediocrities. The number of projects I see abandoned at “dev blog 3” is too high, so by reducing the time you spend writing about your game, you can increase the time you spend making your game. With enough tweaking, any idea can be market viable, but finding your footing is a hard feat. Write about the importance of your additions, and save the mediocrities for later.

“Gamers can feel when developers are passionate about their games. They can smell it like a dog smells fear. Don’t be afraid to hold onto your unique vision: just be aware that it may not turn out exactly how you envisioned.”

Scott Rogers, Level Up!: The Guide to Great Video Game Design

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