There are Too Many Messaging Apps

Greg Meyer
Jul 17, 2015 · 4 min read

Context is Everything

Without context (*where* should I message you back), how do you decide where you should respond to that person? If you’re like most of us, you typically respond on the channel where the person messaged you. Not bad, but all of that context leaves your mind when you encounter that very same person on another messaging platform.

Text is a universal messaging protocol

Let’s imagine this process is easy. You may remember a similar world in the late 90s, where AIM chat, ICQ, and gChat were difficult to merge. At that point the world of SMS was a silo and 2-way video was still mostly the province of Dick Tracy comics even though Skype was on the scene. There was a product called Meebo that aggregated chat services and placed them in a single interface (many other people have used Trillian or Adium with similar purpose).

It’s okay, I like “best in class” messaging

I get it — you’d rather upgrade the devices you have to support the Next Big Thing (whatever that will be) and don’t want to lock yourself into yesterday’s world.

Universal clients will connect the world

The first company to create a universal client will create a true world network. That network will be more powerful than the existing voice or email networks because of the exponential number of nodes involved. Data from things, sensors, and meta-conditions (networks of sensors) will create new messaging methods we can’t even imagine yet.

Information Maven

Devoted to finding, capturing, and categorizing information (and trying to make sense of it.)

Greg Meyer

Written by

Product, Marketing, Data, and Ideas. Startup. Photographer. Artist. Sports fan. Customer Experience. Connector. Notes = mine.

Information Maven

Devoted to finding, capturing, and categorizing information (and trying to make sense of it.)