Voyeurism or Transparency?

We share, a lot. The act of sharing on a network is so prolific today that when we refer to sharing people immediately think about what medium, which social media platform, facebook, Instagram, Snapchat. We are open about our lives and with this transparency we feel like we have access to unbounded perspectives. With money, however, we are still constrained to it’s taboo — we don’t talk about it.

Overall we seek advice from people we trust, our family, our friends or people who we know share our anxieties, that also have debt or also work multiple jobs. But we fail to really talk about our anxieties.

Yeah, I guess! I don’t want to be too nosy. I know people tend to be private about their finances. I’d be interested, but I have doubts that people would be willing to share this information in the social circle.

The more we pushed people about their trusted networks the more a very intricate dichotomy started to form, a pattern about advice began to emerge and it started to point at a thirst for knowledge, but also an intriguing respect for how we identify personalities and trust with our financial networks. We found that data, not a network, can share and provide trustworthy financial advice.

Strategy yes. Particular details is too much, too private. It’s awkward when people start to talk about money.

We like knowing, but not prying. We like to share, but we also need to have a context to that information,

Yes. That would be cool to know. It would be a cool incentive. This should be my goal, this is where I should be. My goals are dependent on my income and on my lifestyle. If it’s an anonymous group that has similar lifestyle. Or to know that ‘This is the annual salary that I’d like to make,’ and know ‘people who make this much, this is what they pay, this is what they spend annually.’ Not everyone is in the same position, so I’d need to have a type of reference. I am on the non-profit side, so I make less than people who are on the tech startup side. Having some type of filter would be useful.

Breaking the taboo of financial transparency shouldn’t make us a voyeur, but should be able to connect us to solutions.

So you don’t feel alone. The most unique part is the transparency of the financial ecosystem or environment that you are living in.

If we can share our voices here, can we also share our stories, our experiences, our struggles and successes?

I think at the end of the day I am interested in how those people managed to do that.
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