Inspired Ideas
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Inspired Ideas

This is an email from Stories That Inspired Us, a newsletter by Inspired Ideas.

Our Favorite Reads: August 2021

Highlighting Good Reads in Social Studies

If you’re getting this newsletter, then you’re likely a passtionate educator always looking for inspiring stories. We’re passionate about education, too, and about elevating voices that inspire us.

This month, we selected a few stories from our colleagues, partners, and networks all about Social Studies that we loved and hope will inspire you to get creative in the classroom:

Immigration and the Social Studies Classroom

By Dr. Heather Vrana, Associate Professor of History at the University of Florida

<Click to read the blog>

🌏 “As social studies educators, we seek to foster civil discourse and provide opportunities for self-reflection. This approach to teaching supports a global community. Yet we need to think carefully about how we can support our students who are already (at such a young age) global citizens.”

Read Immigration and the Social Studies Classroom here.

5 Key Elements of Inquiry in Social Studies

By Nina Sethi, Educator and Guest Blogger

<Click to read the blog>

🌏 “Our takeaways from this information our students shared (and were missing) was that we needed to learn more about American Indians today! So we learned some new vocabulary and background information from documentaries, articles, stories, and more. We also learned about the Virginia Indian tribes as a concrete example of American Indians living near us right now.”

Read 5 Key Elements of Inquiry in Social Studies here.

How to Teach with Primary Sources in Social Studies

By Emily M. Schell, Ed.D., Executive Director of the California Global Education Project at the University of San Diego

<Click to read the blog>

🌏 “When students have access to primary sources that exist within and outside of the classroom, and are encouraged to find and interpret sources using their cultural lenses, they are developing their cultural competence while recognizing and using evidence to critique social inequities.”

Read How to Teach with Primary Sources in Social Studies here.

Civil War Letters in the Classroom

By M. Keith Harris, Historian, History Teacher, and Guest Blogger

<Click to read the blog>

🌏 “The goals of this are multifold. I want them to understand and acknowledge the many motivating factors that drove men of the Union and Confederate armies to enlist. I want them to grasp what was important to soldiers (weather, health, the monotony of camp life). And I especially want them to appreciate that these were real living breathing individuals who missed their families and friends back home.”

Read Civil War Letters in the Classroom here.

Teaching Tough History

By Sheldon L. Eakins, Ph.D., Founder of The Leading Equity Center

<Click to read the blog>

🌏 “There is no ‘you have arrived’ when it comes to providing equitable instruction. There is no step one, two, three, four, and five, and now you’re fully culturally responsive.”

Read Teaching Tough History here.

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