Inspired Ideas
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Inspired Ideas

This is an email from Stories That Inspired Us, a newsletter by Inspired Ideas.

Our Top Reads in 2021

Welcome to the latest edition of the Stories that Inspired Us newsletter, where we take a look back at some recent stories that had a strong impact on us and on our readers.

Despite the challenges 2021 presented students and teachers, our readers and writers were eager to learn from each other. We published stories written by educators, advice from experts, and plenty of practical strategies to implement in the classroom.

In 2021, our top blogs covered getting students excited about science, understanding the science of reading, equitable math instruction, and more. In this issue of Stories that Inspired Us, we’ve decided to highlight our top five most-read blogs from the past year.

We can’t wait to continue to learn, read, and write with you in 2022!

Metacognitive Strategies in the Math Classroom

By Lanette Trowery and Margaret Bowman

“Metacognition is a critical skill in K-5 math education because engaging in metacognitive strategies can help students build a conceptual understanding of content and foster student agency.”

Read Metacognitive Strategies in the Math Classroom here.

Four Reasons to Use Adaptive Technology in Your Remote Science Classroom

“…with the help of adaptive learning technology, remote science instruction can be far less challenging. Adaptive engines learn about the student’s individual learning needs and change direction until that student has thoroughly grasped the content. Adaptive programs are smart, sophisticated, and have endlessly exciting implications. They give students the freedom to learn science in their own way, at their own time, which can make it much more approachable, and “easier” to learn.”

Read Four Reasons to Use Adaptive Technology in Your Remote Science Classroom here.

Phenomena: The Secret Ingredient to Maximizing Remote Student Engagement in Science

“Don’t expect students to come to an understanding of phenomena right away. If they do, without much investigation and inquiry, then you might be using phenomena that aren’t appropriately matched to your student’s grade level. Phenomena allow students the time and space to participate in a process of incremental understanding that’s unique to learning in the science classroom.”

Read Phenomena: The Secret Ingredient to Maximizing Remote Student Engagement in Science here.

Belonging: The Heart of Social and Emotional Learning

By Meena Srinivasan

“Belonging is often characterized as an emotional need we all have to feel seen and connected. While this is true, as educators it’s important to expand and contextualize our understanding of what belonging truly means, especially as our nation faces a deep sense of polarization. True belonging calls upon us to cultivate an expansive, compassionate quality where we enlarge our circles of concern and interrogate all the ways in which we consciously and unconsciously engage in acts of othering.”

Read Belonging: The Heart of Social and Emotional Learning here.

3 Misconceptions About the Science of Reading

Featuring Dr. Timothy Shanahan and Dr. Jan Hasbrouck

“The Science of Reading is not an instructional program or curriculum, nor is any program or material “approved” by the Science of Reading. There is no governing body or organization charged with the responsibility of evaluating the consistency or degree of alignment that instructional programs have with the Science of Reading. The body of research evidence known as the Science of Reading is comprised of more than 40 years of research into how we learn to read.”

Read 3 Common Misconceptions About the Science of Reading here.

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McGraw Hill

McGraw Hill

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