Like a Spoken Word

My first Pride Month out of the closet

Nathan Smith
Interfaith Now

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Last month I came out as pansexual, which means this will be my first Pride Month out of the closet.

This being my first Pride Month open and out, and with my Marriage & Family Therapy graduate program beginning soon, I find myself reflecting on what kind of therapist and queer person I’d like to be. Since coming out, I’ve received nothing but kindness, love, and support from the people who matter most to me. However, numerous relationships with other queer people have shown me that not every LGBTQIA+ person is so fortunate.

Each of us is born like a spoken word, but we enter cultures and communities that have a tendency to speak over us from the beginning — to speak what is familiar to them, their own words, and to even shout over what sounds unfamiliar or even “wrong” in others. This over-speaking can be so severe that, as we grow up, we learn to speak over ourselves. We can spend an entire lifetime with people speaking over us, whether inadvertently or intentionally; or speaking over ourselves, repeating all the words that were most familiar to our families, cultures, and communities. But Life will not be spoken over forever; there are powerful moments and stretches of our lives when we may at last overhear ourselves. The word we hear from within ourselves may sound unfamiliar, perhaps even…

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Nathan Smith
Interfaith Now

Writer, therapy student, queer; interested in psychology, philosophy, literature, religion/spirituality. YouTube.com/@MindMakesThisWorld @NateSmithSNF