The Quiet Ones: How (and Why) Introverts Can Help Save the Church From Itself

Joe Forrest
Interfaith Now
11 min readJul 18, 2022

--

You have a secret you’ve never shared with anybody:

You’ve always felt like an imposter at church.

At praise and worship services, you’d stand when you were expected to stand, sing along with the words on the projection screen, and sometimes even raise your hands with your eyes closed (most often during the key change at the song’s bridge).

But, if you’re honest with yourself (like, really honest), you didn’t do any of that because you felt a supernatural compulsion to do so. You did it because that’s what you thought you were supposed to do. You did it because you wanted to fit in.

On church retreats or at Bible studies, you’d listen to peers describe their relationship with Jesus like it was something out of a paperback romance novel, full of flowery prose and intimate yearnings, and you’d think to yourself, “I wish I knew what that felt like.” And when it came your time to share, you’d exaggerate spiritual experiences to match the energy in the room.

While listening to sermons, you could never turn the analytical part of your brain off. You’d sit in the pew, poking and prodding the message in your head, scanning for logical fallacies and strawman arguments. Sure, you were listening (very attentively), but…

--

--

Joe Forrest
Interfaith Now

Joe Forrest writes on the intersection of faith, culture, secularism, and politics.