4 tips from University Recruiters for the “About Me” section

The little free form text-box at the beginning of every profile can be the most intimidating part of filling out a professional profile or application. What’s worth sharing to recruiters that they don’t already know? Do I tell them what year of school I’m in? Do I tell them where I’m from? WTF is the point of this section anyway? To be honest, we didn’t know what the purpose of the “About Me” section was either. So, we asked University Recruiters (people who show up to the career fair) what they look for and tips for students to stand out from the crowd.

  1. Briefly describe something you’re passionate about.

Talk about one of your hobbies or something you enjoy doing in your free time. Things that you do when you’re not in school can tell recruiters a lot about your personality and fit for their corporate culture.

Examples: I serenade my friends on the weekend with my guitar skills; I enjoy building robots; There’s not a trail within 100 miles that I haven’t hiked.

2. Explain your X factor

Major and GPA are good metrics for sorting through students, but at the end of the day that’s not what gets you the job. Recruiters want to know what makes you different. Is it your attention to detail? Are you someone who typically approaches problems from a completely different perspective?

Examples: I have a congenial personality that allows me to talk to anyone; I have this innate ability to only think out-of-the-box.

3. Talk about your career aspirations.

Recruiters can look at your resume and transcript to see what you’ve done, but they want to know what you’re going to do. Tell them where you see yourself in the next 5 years, or tell them what your goals are.

Examples: I want to work for a company that is going to change the world; I’m an engineer by major, but I have an interest in business; I’d like to be a CEO by the time I’m 40.

4. Keep it short, but sweet.

A recruiter isn’t trying to get your life-story out of the “About Me” section. It’s a piece of the puzzle that they’re examining to get a taste of who you are and if you’re worth pursuing. Give them just enough to make them interested in you. 4 sentences MAX.

Here’s a template to get you started:

“My name is (INSERT NAME). I like to (INSERT HOBBY). I have the ability to (INSERT X FACTOR). I want to (INSERT FUTURE PLANS).”

That’s it. Follow these tips and you’ll stand out from the crowd.

If you found this article helpful, please click the ❤️ button or share it with a friend so that others can benefit from it too.

Show your support

Clapping shows how much you appreciated Nicholas Bachewicz’s story.