Image courtesy of the Earth Science and Remote Sensing Unit, NASA Johnson Space Center

Independent: Climate change is altering global air currents — increasing droughts, heatwaves and floods

Professor Michael Mann, of the Pennsylvania State University, said: “The unprecedented 2016 California drought, the 2011 US heatwave and 2010 Pakistan flood as well as the 2003 European hot spell all belong to a most worrying series of extremes.
“The increased incidence of these events exceeds what we would expect from the direct effects of global warming alone, so there must be an additional climate change effect.
“In data from computer simulations as well as observations, we identify changes that favour unusually persistent, extreme meanders of the jetstream that support such extreme weather events.
“Human activity has been suspected of contributing to this pattern before, but now we uncover a clear fingerprint of human activity.”
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